Month: May 2011

Another Morning Ride

erectile
on Flickr”>Cloudy Skies

Took a nice morning ride out east to Taylor TX, meningitis
then north a bit and back across west through Georgetown and back home. Was pretty windy, but really nice clouds and not too hot. A fun ride!

Golden Fields

5-30-2011-Ride

Moving time: 1h 35m
Moving average: 43.1 mph
Odometer: 68.71 miles

Aloha

I’ve been following Jay’s trip for a few month now. He posts some really good riding videos, capsule drugs with great accompanying music. He’s living the dream. Enjoy!

I’ve been following Jay’s trip for a few month now. He posts some really good riding videos, drugs with great accompanying music. He’s living the dream. Enjoy!
stomatology
on Flickr”>Aloha

A message to those behind me that I mean no harm. (special thanks to my wife)

Garage Girl – Yamaha SR 400

I like this video. And I love that Yamaha SR 400! I wish they sold them here in the States.

Sidecar Passing Sidecar

I’ve been following Jay’s trip for a few month now. He posts some really good riding videos, capsule drugs with great accompanying music. He’s living the dream. Enjoy!

I’ve been following Jay’s trip for a few month now. He posts some really good riding videos, drugs with great accompanying music. He’s living the dream. Enjoy!
stomatology
on Flickr”>Aloha

A message to those behind me that I mean no harm. (special thanks to my wife)
surgeon on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/5701023878/”>Washing

I’ve had my motorcycle for a whole year now and I haven’t washed it once. It’s kind of a tradition that GS’s are supposed to be dirty. I’ve read that at some GS rallies, caries your bike will be disqualified from show contests if it is too clean. I guess since it is an “adventure bike”, it’s meant to be covered in mud. This lack of motorcycle hygiene suits my lazy demeanor just fine. Actually, I do take care of maintenance and clean/lube the chain pretty often, but most surface areas never get cleaned. I just wipe the headlight, taillight and blinkers every so often and that’s enough for me. A couple Sundays ago my kids and I were washing my wife’s car for Mother’s Day and the kids said they wanted to wash the bikes, including my motorcycle. I wouldn’t call it a proper washing (more like a rinse) but I guess once a year won’t hurt, right?
abortion on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/5701023878/”>Washing

I’ve had my motorcycle for a whole year now and I haven’t washed it once. It’s kind of a tradition that GS’s are supposed to be dirty. I’ve read that at some GS rallies, this site your bike will be disqualified from show contests if it is too clean. I guess since it is an “adventure bike”, this it’s meant to be covered in mud. This lack of motorcycle hygiene suits my lazy demeanor just fine. Actually, I do take care of maintenance and clean/lube the chain pretty often, but most surface areas never get cleaned. I just wipe the headlight, taillight and blinkers every so often and that’s enough for me. A couple Sundays ago my kids and I were washing my wife’s car for Mother’s Day and the kids said they wanted to wash the bikes, including my motorcycle. I wouldn’t call it a proper washing (more like a rinse) but I guess once a year won’t hurt, right?
pestilence on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/5814052600/”>Chain Stuff

Ever since I first fixed up my Supercub, more info I’ve been pretty good about keeping the chain in good condition. There’s plenty of debate as to the best way to take care of the chain, but a trusted source on the Honda C70 Yahoo! Group used PJ1-Black so I bought a can and used it. It seemed to work well, and when I got my GS, I kept on using it. A guy at the local motorcycle dealership gave me some more tips on cleaning the chain and I’ve been using the technique he gave me. Basically use some chain cleaner (I have the Motul stuff) and a brush (I have a grunge brush) to clean the chain. Wipe off with a rag. Then go for a short ride to warm up the chain a bit and finally apply your lube of choice. Let the lube set for a couple hours and then you are good to go.

Like I said earlier, PJ1-Black seems to work fine, but I think I spray on too much of the stuff. The sprocket cover has quite a bit of the black gunk on it. Cleaning that off was a messy affair! I did recently find a can of PJ1-Blue while cleaning up the garage. Not sure when I bought this but I might as well give it a try sometime.

But after reading a bit more, I think I will try just using Automatic Transmission Fluid. The advantage of this is that it will clean and lube all in one shot. Plus ATF is really cheap, and I like the CBOA approach. Some people apply it with a brush, while others use a spray bottle. I guess I will use a brush and see how it goes. Anyways, after 7,000 miles my chain and sprockets still look great. I really don’t know if the lubes really help all that much or if it is just another way to spend money. From what I have read, I think that the most important thing is to keep the chain clean and free from dirt and grime and the tension adjusted correctly.

Incidentally, I just saw a video from Touratech and Helge Pederson where he talks a bit about chain maintenance. Enjoy!


One of my favorite bikes ever is the Yamaha XT660Z Ténéré. I think it looks so cool, ambulance has a nice sized engine, hemophilia and I like Japanese engineering. Unfortunately it’s not sold in the States at this time. Plus I would probably need to grow a couple inches to ride it. At any rate, hospital I can dream! My friend Jeremy sent me a link to some excellent photos of the bike. And below is an ADV rider on his Ténéré in Africa. Living the dream!


I’m not sure what is going on here, prescription but I like it!

More Texas Back Roads

A quick evening ride from garage and back before the storm comes in.
I’m going to have to come up with some different titles for these blog posts because I can see myself exploring the smaller county roads of Texas quite a bit! Today I had a few hours of alone-time and decided to go for a long ride. Actually, there I knew I would have this “time off” for a fewe days now so was just hoping the weather would be nice for a ride. As it turned out, the weather was beautiful! I didn’t really have a plan, except that first I would stop by the library to return some books. After that, who knows?

Leaving the library (I used the drive thru dropoff which is kind of fun on a motorcycle) I found myself traveling north to see a newly developed neighborhood in Cedar Park. Just new houses, but it seems like the traffic-circle is making a comeback around these parts. Just for the record, I enjoy them. Some people seem to freak out on them, but these little circles are nothing compared to the insanity that is the traffic circle just south of Signal Hill in SoCal. I remember having to negotiate that thing when we would go to Zed Records’ location at that time. I actually thought that was pretty fun too.

Continuing on, I traveled north (while keeping an eye on my GPS unit) into the Blockhouse Creek neighborhood. I’ve never been there, but it seemed pretty nice. A couple good-sized swimming pools were being put to good use this afternoon. As I rode by I caught the sweet smell of sunscreen. Eventually I found myself on 183 and headed farther north. As soon as I could, I made a left onto a county road, hit the insane cruising speed of 35mph, popped the visor open and took in the scenery.

Distance Ahead

It’s interesting to me to see how people live farther out in the country. As someone who has only lived in the suburbs and larger cities it’s kind of fascinating to wonder how life is on a ranch house with a few acres of land. You know, I don’t even know how big an acre is! So cruising past these homesteads is really fun to me.

Distance Behind

I also get a kick out of seeing different animals while out riding these back-roads. On this particular trip I saw some of the widest horns I’ve ever seen on a bull before. Yes, there are lots of longhorns here in Texas! In addition to those, I saw plenty of smaller cows, horses, mules, jack-rabbits, goats, and I even saw Tina. But the highlight of the ride was probably when a blonde-colored snake, about three feet long, slithered across the road in front of me. That thing was moving! It kind of shocked me. I realized that this is maybe only the 2nd snake I have ever seen in the wild. The first was in the backyard of my old house, so that wasn’t really wild, was it? Anyways, I continued riding the backroads enjoying the sights and smells or rural Texas.

Lonely Road

I did ride a little bit of hard-packed dirt, which is always a little sketchy. But it all turned out fine (it was only a hundred yards or so). Another really cool stretch of road went parallel to some train tracks for a mile or so. I stopped on that road to have some water and could hear gunfire in the distance. I guess some folks were enjoying their Sunday afternoons with some target practice. Of course for the next few minutes I kept expecting to get hit by a stray bullet. Anyways, on the way back home there was a mini-water crossing which added a little more dicey-ness to the day. Hey, even these slow rides have excitement!

5-22-2011 Ride

GPS Stats:
Moving Time: 2:38
Moving Average: 36.8 mph
Odometer: 97.2 miles

A Quick Ride Around the Neighborhood

A quick evening ride from garage and back before the storm comes in.

Favorite Bikes: Yamaha XT660X Ténéré

I’ve been following Jay’s trip for a few month now. He posts some really good riding videos, capsule drugs with great accompanying music. He’s living the dream. Enjoy!

I’ve been following Jay’s trip for a few month now. He posts some really good riding videos, drugs with great accompanying music. He’s living the dream. Enjoy!
stomatology
on Flickr”>Aloha

A message to those behind me that I mean no harm. (special thanks to my wife)
surgeon on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/5701023878/”>Washing

I’ve had my motorcycle for a whole year now and I haven’t washed it once. It’s kind of a tradition that GS’s are supposed to be dirty. I’ve read that at some GS rallies, caries your bike will be disqualified from show contests if it is too clean. I guess since it is an “adventure bike”, it’s meant to be covered in mud. This lack of motorcycle hygiene suits my lazy demeanor just fine. Actually, I do take care of maintenance and clean/lube the chain pretty often, but most surface areas never get cleaned. I just wipe the headlight, taillight and blinkers every so often and that’s enough for me. A couple Sundays ago my kids and I were washing my wife’s car for Mother’s Day and the kids said they wanted to wash the bikes, including my motorcycle. I wouldn’t call it a proper washing (more like a rinse) but I guess once a year won’t hurt, right?
abortion on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/5701023878/”>Washing

I’ve had my motorcycle for a whole year now and I haven’t washed it once. It’s kind of a tradition that GS’s are supposed to be dirty. I’ve read that at some GS rallies, this site your bike will be disqualified from show contests if it is too clean. I guess since it is an “adventure bike”, this it’s meant to be covered in mud. This lack of motorcycle hygiene suits my lazy demeanor just fine. Actually, I do take care of maintenance and clean/lube the chain pretty often, but most surface areas never get cleaned. I just wipe the headlight, taillight and blinkers every so often and that’s enough for me. A couple Sundays ago my kids and I were washing my wife’s car for Mother’s Day and the kids said they wanted to wash the bikes, including my motorcycle. I wouldn’t call it a proper washing (more like a rinse) but I guess once a year won’t hurt, right?
pestilence on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/5814052600/”>Chain Stuff

Ever since I first fixed up my Supercub, more info I’ve been pretty good about keeping the chain in good condition. There’s plenty of debate as to the best way to take care of the chain, but a trusted source on the Honda C70 Yahoo! Group used PJ1-Black so I bought a can and used it. It seemed to work well, and when I got my GS, I kept on using it. A guy at the local motorcycle dealership gave me some more tips on cleaning the chain and I’ve been using the technique he gave me. Basically use some chain cleaner (I have the Motul stuff) and a brush (I have a grunge brush) to clean the chain. Wipe off with a rag. Then go for a short ride to warm up the chain a bit and finally apply your lube of choice. Let the lube set for a couple hours and then you are good to go.

Like I said earlier, PJ1-Black seems to work fine, but I think I spray on too much of the stuff. The sprocket cover has quite a bit of the black gunk on it. Cleaning that off was a messy affair! I did recently find a can of PJ1-Blue while cleaning up the garage. Not sure when I bought this but I might as well give it a try sometime.

But after reading a bit more, I think I will try just using Automatic Transmission Fluid. The advantage of this is that it will clean and lube all in one shot. Plus ATF is really cheap, and I like the CBOA approach. Some people apply it with a brush, while others use a spray bottle. I guess I will use a brush and see how it goes. Anyways, after 7,000 miles my chain and sprockets still look great. I really don’t know if the lubes really help all that much or if it is just another way to spend money. From what I have read, I think that the most important thing is to keep the chain clean and free from dirt and grime and the tension adjusted correctly.

Incidentally, I just saw a video from Touratech and Helge Pederson where he talks a bit about chain maintenance. Enjoy!


One of my favorite bikes ever is the Yamaha XT660Z Ténéré. I think it looks so cool, ambulance has a nice sized engine, hemophilia and I like Japanese engineering. Unfortunately it’s not sold in the States at this time. Plus I would probably need to grow a couple inches to ride it. At any rate, hospital I can dream! My friend Jeremy sent me a link to some excellent photos of the bike. And below is an ADV rider on his Ténéré in Africa. Living the dream!

Washing the Bike

I’ve been following Jay’s trip for a few month now. He posts some really good riding videos, capsule drugs with great accompanying music. He’s living the dream. Enjoy!

I’ve been following Jay’s trip for a few month now. He posts some really good riding videos, drugs with great accompanying music. He’s living the dream. Enjoy!
stomatology
on Flickr”>Aloha

A message to those behind me that I mean no harm. (special thanks to my wife)
surgeon on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/5701023878/”>Washing

I’ve had my motorcycle for a whole year now and I haven’t washed it once. It’s kind of a tradition that GS’s are supposed to be dirty. I’ve read that at some GS rallies, caries your bike will be disqualified from show contests if it is too clean. I guess since it is an “adventure bike”, it’s meant to be covered in mud. This lack of motorcycle hygiene suits my lazy demeanor just fine. Actually, I do take care of maintenance and clean/lube the chain pretty often, but most surface areas never get cleaned. I just wipe the headlight, taillight and blinkers every so often and that’s enough for me. A couple Sundays ago my kids and I were washing my wife’s car for Mother’s Day and the kids said they wanted to wash the bikes, including my motorcycle. I wouldn’t call it a proper washing (more like a rinse) but I guess once a year won’t hurt, right?

Riding Back Roads of Texas

weight loss on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/5152245945/”>My F650 GS

I had a few hours free this morning so I decided to ride over to the coffee shop and get some caffiene. After that, help I dropped off a book at the library then was planning to go home and relax but then I thought I would ride to the nearby school’s parking lot and practice some u-turns. I still have some trouble making these and the last time I practiced, angina I just wasn’t feeling it. I was a little tired and just couldn’t concentrate. I was disappointed because the previous time, I was really getting the hang of it.

But this morning I was fired up (most likely the coffee) and figured I might as well use this opportunity to sharpen my skills rather than just go home and play video games. I’m happy to say that it was clicking for me today and I was making much tighter turns, and my muscle-memory was taking over. That was really cool because I didn’t have to think so much about controlling the clutch and throttle. It just all seemed to work naturally.

A few months ago I bought the book Proficient Motorcycling by David L. Hough. It filled with great information that every motorcyclist should know. One surprisingly short section deals with u-turns and I picked up a couple good tips. I learned that to do a tight turn, you really need to lean the bike over. If you are just slow-speed turning with the bike perpendicular to the ground your turning radius is pretty large. So large in fact that you probably won’t be able to pull off a u-turn on a two lane street. (I know from personal experience!) So first, you need to throw the bike into a lean, while turning the handlebars pretty sharply. Then you need to use the clutch to control the stability. It helps to keep the throttle at a constant rev, and then just feather the clutch. To make a tighter turn, pull in the clutch lever. If the bike is leaning over too much and you feel like it’s tipping, let out the clutch and that power will straighten you up. After a while of practicing that, I started using the throttle more in conjuction with the clutch (and not having just a constant rev). This part is where the muscle memory and practice really paid off. Now when I feel the bike is at the tipping point, I don’t have to think about what to do to get it back in control. My left hand automatically lets out the clutch, and my right applies a bit more throttle. This is a really cool feeling!

A couple other things help me with the u-turns. First is keeping my body and head more perpendicular to the ground, and using the footpegs to maintain balance. It’s like when you are riding a bike up a hill and you stand up to get more pedaling power. The bike leans from side to side as you pump, while your body is pretty much straight up and down. On the motorcycle, you can lean the bike over, then apply pressure to the opposite peg to help balance it.

Another thing that helps is to look where you want to go. That’s one of the first things they teach you in the MSF class. And when you are doing u-turns you not only look with your eyes, but you crane your neck around pretty far. For me, I kind of just imagine the line I want to be taking, then look along that line about 20 feet out. In MSF, they say that if you see an obstacle in the road, don’t fixate on it, because you will head right towards it. For u-turns, I use this target fixation to help me guide where I want the bike to go. Kind of neat since it works!

I’ve also read that it helps to “drag” the rear brake as this will supposedly stabilize the bike. I’ve tried this a little bit, but was probably applying too much brake, since I stalled it out a couple times. Hopefully as the rest of the process becomes second-nature, I can add this element into the mix.

I still need to practice (never stop learning!) especially in one key area. I have trouble initiating the turn immediately from a stop. I usually need about five to eight feet of straight line acceleration before throwing it into the lean. In a few videos I’ve seen online, the rider will turn the bars first, then accelerate directly into a tight turn. Looks so easy! Hopefully I can improve in that area. Looking forward to the day that it “clicks” for me!
pharmacy on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/5561824687/”>CL-MAX

I ordered a new helmet to replace my 5-year old HJC CL-14. I really like the CL-14, but it’s getting old and it’s recommended that you buy a new helmet every 3-5 years because the materials degenerate. Not sure how much of that is true but it’s a good excuse to get some new goodies. For the new helmet, I wanted to get a modular. This kind has a chinbar that flips up. It’s kind of convenient in that you can flip it up to talk to people or go into the gas station without having to take the whole helmet off (and reveal your helmet-hair). I’ve had my eye on the Shoei Multitec but they are pretty expensive. I tried on the Schuberth C3 which and it was so nice — super comfortable and slim-looking. The only problem is that it goes for $699.

So I decided to keep with HJC, which is a decent brand and fits my head well. The CL-MAX came down in price (60% off!) so I decided it was time. I went with a silver color to match my bike. I know white is safer but really liked the look of the silver one. The noise level compared to my old CL-14 is less on the whole, but the main difference is that I don’t hear as much low sound from wind turbulence. Most of the noise is higher-pitched which probably comes from the extra seams in the helmet for the flip-up chinbar. This shifting of the noise frequency is good because earplugs should really remove the highs. The padding inside the helmet seems a whole lot better. The ear-pocket is better protected from wind which means less fatigue when riding at 65mph.

Another plus about the CL-MAX is that it uses the same visor latch size as my CL-14. That means I can use my dark smoke shield on it (and save $25).

BTW, I am a firm believer in ATGATT, which stands for “All The Gear, All The Time”. Motorcycle boots, pants, gloves, jacket, and helmet every time I ride. Besides being safer, it’s also a great excuse to get some nice gear!
I ran across an amazing ride report from DaveG last night. He’s currently on his RTW trip on a Suzuki DRZ400. Before that, pharmacy he rode his BMW F650 GS from Texas down to Tierra del Fuego. Incredible! I was doing a YouTube search on “Austin Motorcycle” and found an old video of his in which he and a friend go off-road for the first time on their DL650 Vstroms. It’s so interesting to see the progression from that video, psychotherapist to the trip to the tip of the South America, decease and even more exciting to follow his travels around the world. I really envy and admire travelers like this. I’m so glad that he shares all this on his blog with good gear lists and bike info. Great stuff. Good luck Dave!
tadalafil on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/5630569203/”>Bike Maintenance

Another day of routine maintenance on the bike. This time it’s a coolant change. Looked like it would be a super easy job. It turns out it was simple, but a little frustrating at one point. The F650 GS takes the normal 50/50 antifreeze coolant so it’s a really cheap bit of work. The only other thing you need to buy is a small copper crush washer, size A6X10. I just ordered a few from Lonestar BMW for 40 cents each. I also bought a funnel that had some marks on the side of it so I would know exactly how much antifreeze I was putting in. It turns out this funnel is unnecessary so I will be returning it.

First, you need to start with a cold bike. Then, remove the left-side faux tank cover so you have access to the radiator cap and reservoir tank. Next, unscrew the radiator cap and remove the reservoir cover. After that, loosen the drain plug at the bottom of the water pump cover. Make sure you have some kind of container to catch the old coolant. I used an old water jug and a big funnel. When taking out the drain plug (and washer) make sure not to drop it into the old coolant. You’ll also need to disconnect the radiator hose to get the fluid out of the radiator. Lastly, remove the reservoir and dump the old coolant that was in there. Reattach the hose, put a new crush washer on the drainplug, apply a little loctite, then tighten it back up.

Next I wanted to bleed the cooling system and to do this, you are supposed to attach a tube to the bleed valve, then loosen it and start adding coolant to the radiator. Any air in the system will be forced out and when you see a steady stream of coolant coming out, tighten the bleed valve. The problem I had was that I couldn’t for the life of me find the bleed valve. I had a photo from f650.com and also the photo from the official service manual. I must have spent 20 minutes searching! Well, it turns out that the twin-spark F650 GS’s do not have a bleed valve, but just a regular bolt instead. This makes bleeding the cooling system a little trickier. Since you can’t attach a tube, I ended up sticking a straw into the hole. Positioned under the other side of the straw was the water jug and funnel. I started adding fluid to the radiator, and when I saw fresh coolant coming out of the straw, I quickly popped the bold back in there. It was a little messy and I’m not sure a little air didn’t get back in there, but what are you gonna do?

Next I topped up the radiator with coolant, and put some in the reservoir to the MIN line. I put the radiator and reservoir caps back on, then started up the bike. After about 10 minutes the fan kicked in which meant it was warmed up. Then I let it cool down and unscrewed the radiator cap and topped it up again. I also filled the reservoir to the max level. I put the plastics back on the bike, and was done! Later on I went for a ride and then checked the coolant level again, but it was the same level.

This was my first coolant change, and they recommend you change it every 2,000 miles so I was well overdue. It’s an easy and quick procedure, so I will be doing ti following the recommended schedule! Next maintenance that I would like to do is a valve check. This will be a little more involved, but I’d rather do it myself since service at the dealer is crazy expensive!
cialis sale on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/5606530744/”>Open-air Vehicles

Went for a ride downtown this morning to go see the prostate _Texas)” target=”_blank”>Treaty Oak. I read about this in Kinky Friedman’s wonderful book, more about  The Great Psychedelic Armadillo Picnic: A “Walk” in Austin and wanted to check it out. Unfortunately 6th Street was blocked off due to construction so I didn’t get to see it. However, downtown Austin on a Sunday morning is really nice. Hardly any traffic at all, and lots to look at. I saw a few scooters prowling the streets, and lots of bicyclists and runners. Only a couple people on motorcycles, though. They must be all out in the Hill Country enjoying the fine weather.

The above photo was taken while I was getting coffee. I really should stop and take photos at more interesting places than parking lots. That was actually what I was planning on doing at the Treaty Oak! Kondo ne. (Later)
pills on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/5606530744/”>Open-air Vehicles

Went for a ride downtown this morning to go see the try _Texas)” target=”_blank”>Treaty Oak. I read about this in Kinky Friedman’s wonderful book, The Great Psychedelic Armadillo Picnic: A “Walk” in Austin and wanted to check it out. Unfortunately 6th Street was blocked off due to construction so I didn’t get to see it. However, downtown Austin on a Sunday morning is really nice. Hardly any traffic at all, and lots to look at. I saw a few scooters prowling the streets, and lots of bicyclists and runners. Only a couple people on motorcycles, though. They must be all out in the Hill Country enjoying the fine weather.

The above photo was taken while I was getting coffee. I really should stop and take photos at more interesting places than parking lots. That was actually what I was planning on doing at the Treaty Oak! Kondo ne. (Later)
sales on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/5723276170/”>In the Shade

Had a great ride this morning! I decided to explore some back roads relatively nearby which I haven’t really done before. I usually zoom past the side roads while putting miles on the bike, and since I’m going the speed limit (around 60 mph) I don’t have enough time to slow down and turn in. Plus u-turns were a little sketchy for me. But since I’ve been practicing slow-speed manouevering a bit, I am a lot more confident doing those u-turns. And the fact that not being able to flat-foot both feet is not a worry anymore (I usually shift to the left and get one foot firmly planted, which is perfectly adequate) makes these smaller roads more accessible to me. At any rate, I decided to just wander around the area with a loose plan of where I was going. Basically take 1431 to Nameless Rd., left on Round Mountain Rd. and from there make my way up north of Liberty Hill.

Country Road

It was a little cold and I was wearing my mesh jacket, so I was shivering a bit until the sun came up a little higher and started to heat the air up. I was happy to have the heated handgrips! But soon it got warmer and I was really enjoying the ride. It was nice to ride the small back roads at the slower speeds. There was hardly any traffic so I could ride whatever speed I wanted to, which was usually around 35 mph. Riding slowly like that has some advantages. First, I didn’t have as much cold wind chilling me. But more importantly, riding slowly lets me take a look around at the scenery. The back roads I took today went by ranches and farms so I saw lots of horses, a few cows, and several goats. Also, traveling slowly makes stopping to take photos a lot more convenient. The fact that there was no traffic meant I could just pull over to the side of the road and not need a turn-out. The times I did stop, I didn’t see a single car or truck pass me. It really felt like I was in the boonies!

Tree-lined

Riding a motorcycle fast is certainly fun, but I really enjoyed slowing down and taking in the sights. I’m working my way up to gravel/dirt roads in the future and I’m sure there are even more cool sights to see farther off the beaten track.

Under the Oak

5-11-2011 Ride Route

The route I took. 80.2 miles, with a moving average of 38.2 mph.

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