capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.

Yamaha has some neat little models of their motorcycles that you can build. Just print out the pdf’s, medicine cut the pieces out, mind
and you can assemble a cool little motorcycle. The YZF-R1 also has a cool toolkit, jack-stand, and other accessories.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.

Yamaha has some neat little models of their motorcycles that you can build. Just print out the pdf’s, medicine cut the pieces out, mind
and you can assemble a cool little motorcycle. The YZF-R1 also has a cool toolkit, jack-stand, and other accessories.
That’s on my temporary driver’s license. It means I can legally operate a motorcycle! I was only planning to renew my regular license today, orthopedist
then study the little Motorcyclist’s Handbook before taking the test at a later day, opisthorchiasis
but after waiting an hour at the Texas Department of Public Safety (DMV to you non-Texans), treat I said to myself, “I’m not waiting here again” and I decided to just take the motorcycle test. I figured that the info from the MSF course was still fresh in my mind, so I had a good chance of passing. The test was done on a computer, with 20 total questions. You can skip questions, and they will be repeated later. You only actually need to answer 14 right, so I skipped a bunch, and answered the easy ones first. I then came back to the ones I skipped, answered three of them correctly, and the test ended, indicating that I answered 14 correctly (100% correct) and I passed. Woohoo!
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.

Yamaha has some neat little models of their motorcycles that you can build. Just print out the pdf’s, medicine cut the pieces out, mind
and you can assemble a cool little motorcycle. The YZF-R1 also has a cool toolkit, jack-stand, and other accessories.
That’s on my temporary driver’s license. It means I can legally operate a motorcycle! I was only planning to renew my regular license today, orthopedist
then study the little Motorcyclist’s Handbook before taking the test at a later day, opisthorchiasis
but after waiting an hour at the Texas Department of Public Safety (DMV to you non-Texans), treat I said to myself, “I’m not waiting here again” and I decided to just take the motorcycle test. I figured that the info from the MSF course was still fresh in my mind, so I had a good chance of passing. The test was done on a computer, with 20 total questions. You can skip questions, and they will be repeated later. You only actually need to answer 14 right, so I skipped a bunch, and answered the easy ones first. I then came back to the ones I skipped, answered three of them correctly, and the test ended, indicating that I answered 14 correctly (100% correct) and I passed. Woohoo!
On Saturday, psychotherapist
I woke up bright and early and met my fellow students at “the range” which was the Pflugerville High School parking lot. There, medicine we met the instructor, and those without their own helmets and/or gloves got fitted with ones the class provided. I had my HJC half-helmet and leather gloves, so I was all set. The bikes that they had for us were Kawasaki Eliminators and Honda Rebels. The two students who had the most experience got the two Rebels, which were 250’s, and the rest of us got the Eliminators, which were 125cc machines. In all, there were seven of us, because one of the women from the Thursday night class didn’t show. Anyways, we all got our helmets and gloves on, then got on our bikes. The instructor led us through a quick tour of the bikes, then we “power-walked” our bikes to the staging area, and the actual range.

Our first exercise was power-walking (actually, walking while mounted on the bike, but without actually starting up the engine) across the range, then turning the bike around, then coming back. It was during this first exercise that one of the students, and older lady who I suppose was in her mid-fifties, dropped her bike and had to be helped up. We finished the exercise, then took a break. The lady decided that she needed to take some private lessons before re-taking the MSF class, and called it quits for now. That kind of sucked, because she was so gung-ho before the class, and was the first one at the range that morning, waiting with helmet and gloves.

Anyways, the rest of the morning was spent riding around the range doing a number of drills and learning the basics. It was tons of fun, and really helped, especially learning how to counter-steer. That is incredible, and so easy after a little practice.

In the afternoon, we went to the classroom and finished up our book-studying. At the end, we took a written test, and I scored a perfect 100.

The next day, we met at the range once again at 6:45am. The woman who was a no-show the day before showed up and asked to reschedule. We were wondering what happened to her, but I guess something came up… The Sunday training class wasn’t quite as fun as the first day, because we focused on slow-speed maneouvers (not that the previous day was filled with high speed thrills) and also because it started raining. I had a rain jacket, so I was dry up top, but my pants got soaked.

The training went well, although I had a bit of trouble shifting from first to second. It always happened as I started the exercise and was heading towards the instructor. Later on, I just kept it in second the whole time, including accelerating from a stop. At about noon, we were finished with our training, and it was time for our riding tests. I think there were five skill evaluations, and for each mistake you make, you get one or more points. You are allowed up to 21 points to pass, and I ended up with 11 points. I thought I did better, but oh well… I know where my riding weaknesses are, which are slow right-hand turns, and emergency stopping. :O

In the end, all of us passed, with scores ranging from five up to 16. I got my certificate, a patch, and some coupons for riding gear at the local motorcycle shops. Next step is for me to take the written test at the Texas Dept. of Transportation to get my motorcycle endorsement. Then, I can decide if I want to insure and register my C70. I already have my eye on restoring a bigger bike, a Honda CB350 from the early 70’s. We’ll see…
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.

Yamaha has some neat little models of their motorcycles that you can build. Just print out the pdf’s, medicine cut the pieces out, mind
and you can assemble a cool little motorcycle. The YZF-R1 also has a cool toolkit, jack-stand, and other accessories.
That’s on my temporary driver’s license. It means I can legally operate a motorcycle! I was only planning to renew my regular license today, orthopedist
then study the little Motorcyclist’s Handbook before taking the test at a later day, opisthorchiasis
but after waiting an hour at the Texas Department of Public Safety (DMV to you non-Texans), treat I said to myself, “I’m not waiting here again” and I decided to just take the motorcycle test. I figured that the info from the MSF course was still fresh in my mind, so I had a good chance of passing. The test was done on a computer, with 20 total questions. You can skip questions, and they will be repeated later. You only actually need to answer 14 right, so I skipped a bunch, and answered the easy ones first. I then came back to the ones I skipped, answered three of them correctly, and the test ended, indicating that I answered 14 correctly (100% correct) and I passed. Woohoo!
On Saturday, psychotherapist
I woke up bright and early and met my fellow students at “the range” which was the Pflugerville High School parking lot. There, medicine we met the instructor, and those without their own helmets and/or gloves got fitted with ones the class provided. I had my HJC half-helmet and leather gloves, so I was all set. The bikes that they had for us were Kawasaki Eliminators and Honda Rebels. The two students who had the most experience got the two Rebels, which were 250’s, and the rest of us got the Eliminators, which were 125cc machines. In all, there were seven of us, because one of the women from the Thursday night class didn’t show. Anyways, we all got our helmets and gloves on, then got on our bikes. The instructor led us through a quick tour of the bikes, then we “power-walked” our bikes to the staging area, and the actual range.

Our first exercise was power-walking (actually, walking while mounted on the bike, but without actually starting up the engine) across the range, then turning the bike around, then coming back. It was during this first exercise that one of the students, and older lady who I suppose was in her mid-fifties, dropped her bike and had to be helped up. We finished the exercise, then took a break. The lady decided that she needed to take some private lessons before re-taking the MSF class, and called it quits for now. That kind of sucked, because she was so gung-ho before the class, and was the first one at the range that morning, waiting with helmet and gloves.

Anyways, the rest of the morning was spent riding around the range doing a number of drills and learning the basics. It was tons of fun, and really helped, especially learning how to counter-steer. That is incredible, and so easy after a little practice.

In the afternoon, we went to the classroom and finished up our book-studying. At the end, we took a written test, and I scored a perfect 100.

The next day, we met at the range once again at 6:45am. The woman who was a no-show the day before showed up and asked to reschedule. We were wondering what happened to her, but I guess something came up… The Sunday training class wasn’t quite as fun as the first day, because we focused on slow-speed maneouvers (not that the previous day was filled with high speed thrills) and also because it started raining. I had a rain jacket, so I was dry up top, but my pants got soaked.

The training went well, although I had a bit of trouble shifting from first to second. It always happened as I started the exercise and was heading towards the instructor. Later on, I just kept it in second the whole time, including accelerating from a stop. At about noon, we were finished with our training, and it was time for our riding tests. I think there were five skill evaluations, and for each mistake you make, you get one or more points. You are allowed up to 21 points to pass, and I ended up with 11 points. I thought I did better, but oh well… I know where my riding weaknesses are, which are slow right-hand turns, and emergency stopping. :O

In the end, all of us passed, with scores ranging from five up to 16. I got my certificate, a patch, and some coupons for riding gear at the local motorcycle shops. Next step is for me to take the written test at the Texas Dept. of Transportation to get my motorcycle endorsement. Then, I can decide if I want to insure and register my C70. I already have my eye on restoring a bigger bike, a Honda CB350 from the early 70’s. We’ll see…
Last night I went to the first class for the MSF Beginners Course. There were eight students, search including me, ailment
and the rider experience ranged from “used to ride a lot, side effects
but some years ago” to “I only sat on a bike once”. The youngest student was probably about 21, the oldest was nearing 60. Basically, the classroom session was going thru the course book, and answering the test questions, then talking about the answers in more detail. The instructor was very knowledgeable and funny, and had some nice insights. The things we covered from the book were really basic, though, like motorcycle controls, basic operation, and gear. I am really looking forward to the riding portions of the course, which start tomorrow and end on Sunday. It’s going to be fun!
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.

Yamaha has some neat little models of their motorcycles that you can build. Just print out the pdf’s, medicine cut the pieces out, mind
and you can assemble a cool little motorcycle. The YZF-R1 also has a cool toolkit, jack-stand, and other accessories.
That’s on my temporary driver’s license. It means I can legally operate a motorcycle! I was only planning to renew my regular license today, orthopedist
then study the little Motorcyclist’s Handbook before taking the test at a later day, opisthorchiasis
but after waiting an hour at the Texas Department of Public Safety (DMV to you non-Texans), treat I said to myself, “I’m not waiting here again” and I decided to just take the motorcycle test. I figured that the info from the MSF course was still fresh in my mind, so I had a good chance of passing. The test was done on a computer, with 20 total questions. You can skip questions, and they will be repeated later. You only actually need to answer 14 right, so I skipped a bunch, and answered the easy ones first. I then came back to the ones I skipped, answered three of them correctly, and the test ended, indicating that I answered 14 correctly (100% correct) and I passed. Woohoo!
On Saturday, psychotherapist
I woke up bright and early and met my fellow students at “the range” which was the Pflugerville High School parking lot. There, medicine we met the instructor, and those without their own helmets and/or gloves got fitted with ones the class provided. I had my HJC half-helmet and leather gloves, so I was all set. The bikes that they had for us were Kawasaki Eliminators and Honda Rebels. The two students who had the most experience got the two Rebels, which were 250’s, and the rest of us got the Eliminators, which were 125cc machines. In all, there were seven of us, because one of the women from the Thursday night class didn’t show. Anyways, we all got our helmets and gloves on, then got on our bikes. The instructor led us through a quick tour of the bikes, then we “power-walked” our bikes to the staging area, and the actual range.

Our first exercise was power-walking (actually, walking while mounted on the bike, but without actually starting up the engine) across the range, then turning the bike around, then coming back. It was during this first exercise that one of the students, and older lady who I suppose was in her mid-fifties, dropped her bike and had to be helped up. We finished the exercise, then took a break. The lady decided that she needed to take some private lessons before re-taking the MSF class, and called it quits for now. That kind of sucked, because she was so gung-ho before the class, and was the first one at the range that morning, waiting with helmet and gloves.

Anyways, the rest of the morning was spent riding around the range doing a number of drills and learning the basics. It was tons of fun, and really helped, especially learning how to counter-steer. That is incredible, and so easy after a little practice.

In the afternoon, we went to the classroom and finished up our book-studying. At the end, we took a written test, and I scored a perfect 100.

The next day, we met at the range once again at 6:45am. The woman who was a no-show the day before showed up and asked to reschedule. We were wondering what happened to her, but I guess something came up… The Sunday training class wasn’t quite as fun as the first day, because we focused on slow-speed maneouvers (not that the previous day was filled with high speed thrills) and also because it started raining. I had a rain jacket, so I was dry up top, but my pants got soaked.

The training went well, although I had a bit of trouble shifting from first to second. It always happened as I started the exercise and was heading towards the instructor. Later on, I just kept it in second the whole time, including accelerating from a stop. At about noon, we were finished with our training, and it was time for our riding tests. I think there were five skill evaluations, and for each mistake you make, you get one or more points. You are allowed up to 21 points to pass, and I ended up with 11 points. I thought I did better, but oh well… I know where my riding weaknesses are, which are slow right-hand turns, and emergency stopping. :O

In the end, all of us passed, with scores ranging from five up to 16. I got my certificate, a patch, and some coupons for riding gear at the local motorcycle shops. Next step is for me to take the written test at the Texas Dept. of Transportation to get my motorcycle endorsement. Then, I can decide if I want to insure and register my C70. I already have my eye on restoring a bigger bike, a Honda CB350 from the early 70’s. We’ll see…
Last night I went to the first class for the MSF Beginners Course. There were eight students, search including me, ailment
and the rider experience ranged from “used to ride a lot, side effects
but some years ago” to “I only sat on a bike once”. The youngest student was probably about 21, the oldest was nearing 60. Basically, the classroom session was going thru the course book, and answering the test questions, then talking about the answers in more detail. The instructor was very knowledgeable and funny, and had some nice insights. The things we covered from the book were really basic, though, like motorcycle controls, basic operation, and gear. I am really looking forward to the riding portions of the course, which start tomorrow and end on Sunday. It’s going to be fun!

Honda has this cool scooter prototype that runs on gasoline and electric power. Yes, shop
it’s a hybrid scooter! I am not too crazy about the looks, discount
but the concept is cool, and it should get incredible gas mileage. Maybe even better than the ~100mpg my C70 Passport gets!
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.

Yamaha has some neat little models of their motorcycles that you can build. Just print out the pdf’s, medicine cut the pieces out, mind
and you can assemble a cool little motorcycle. The YZF-R1 also has a cool toolkit, jack-stand, and other accessories.
That’s on my temporary driver’s license. It means I can legally operate a motorcycle! I was only planning to renew my regular license today, orthopedist
then study the little Motorcyclist’s Handbook before taking the test at a later day, opisthorchiasis
but after waiting an hour at the Texas Department of Public Safety (DMV to you non-Texans), treat I said to myself, “I’m not waiting here again” and I decided to just take the motorcycle test. I figured that the info from the MSF course was still fresh in my mind, so I had a good chance of passing. The test was done on a computer, with 20 total questions. You can skip questions, and they will be repeated later. You only actually need to answer 14 right, so I skipped a bunch, and answered the easy ones first. I then came back to the ones I skipped, answered three of them correctly, and the test ended, indicating that I answered 14 correctly (100% correct) and I passed. Woohoo!
On Saturday, psychotherapist
I woke up bright and early and met my fellow students at “the range” which was the Pflugerville High School parking lot. There, medicine we met the instructor, and those without their own helmets and/or gloves got fitted with ones the class provided. I had my HJC half-helmet and leather gloves, so I was all set. The bikes that they had for us were Kawasaki Eliminators and Honda Rebels. The two students who had the most experience got the two Rebels, which were 250’s, and the rest of us got the Eliminators, which were 125cc machines. In all, there were seven of us, because one of the women from the Thursday night class didn’t show. Anyways, we all got our helmets and gloves on, then got on our bikes. The instructor led us through a quick tour of the bikes, then we “power-walked” our bikes to the staging area, and the actual range.

Our first exercise was power-walking (actually, walking while mounted on the bike, but without actually starting up the engine) across the range, then turning the bike around, then coming back. It was during this first exercise that one of the students, and older lady who I suppose was in her mid-fifties, dropped her bike and had to be helped up. We finished the exercise, then took a break. The lady decided that she needed to take some private lessons before re-taking the MSF class, and called it quits for now. That kind of sucked, because she was so gung-ho before the class, and was the first one at the range that morning, waiting with helmet and gloves.

Anyways, the rest of the morning was spent riding around the range doing a number of drills and learning the basics. It was tons of fun, and really helped, especially learning how to counter-steer. That is incredible, and so easy after a little practice.

In the afternoon, we went to the classroom and finished up our book-studying. At the end, we took a written test, and I scored a perfect 100.

The next day, we met at the range once again at 6:45am. The woman who was a no-show the day before showed up and asked to reschedule. We were wondering what happened to her, but I guess something came up… The Sunday training class wasn’t quite as fun as the first day, because we focused on slow-speed maneouvers (not that the previous day was filled with high speed thrills) and also because it started raining. I had a rain jacket, so I was dry up top, but my pants got soaked.

The training went well, although I had a bit of trouble shifting from first to second. It always happened as I started the exercise and was heading towards the instructor. Later on, I just kept it in second the whole time, including accelerating from a stop. At about noon, we were finished with our training, and it was time for our riding tests. I think there were five skill evaluations, and for each mistake you make, you get one or more points. You are allowed up to 21 points to pass, and I ended up with 11 points. I thought I did better, but oh well… I know where my riding weaknesses are, which are slow right-hand turns, and emergency stopping. :O

In the end, all of us passed, with scores ranging from five up to 16. I got my certificate, a patch, and some coupons for riding gear at the local motorcycle shops. Next step is for me to take the written test at the Texas Dept. of Transportation to get my motorcycle endorsement. Then, I can decide if I want to insure and register my C70. I already have my eye on restoring a bigger bike, a Honda CB350 from the early 70’s. We’ll see…
Last night I went to the first class for the MSF Beginners Course. There were eight students, search including me, ailment
and the rider experience ranged from “used to ride a lot, side effects
but some years ago” to “I only sat on a bike once”. The youngest student was probably about 21, the oldest was nearing 60. Basically, the classroom session was going thru the course book, and answering the test questions, then talking about the answers in more detail. The instructor was very knowledgeable and funny, and had some nice insights. The things we covered from the book were really basic, though, like motorcycle controls, basic operation, and gear. I am really looking forward to the riding portions of the course, which start tomorrow and end on Sunday. It’s going to be fun!

Honda has this cool scooter prototype that runs on gasoline and electric power. Yes, shop
it’s a hybrid scooter! I am not too crazy about the looks, discount
but the concept is cool, and it should get incredible gas mileage. Maybe even better than the ~100mpg my C70 Passport gets!
I put the new tire on the front, capsule
filled it with air, cialis and it seems alright. I also checked the hi-beam light and it works nicely. I took it up to about 35mph tonight, help
I think it will go above 40mph, but I didn’t let it get up to speed. I guess the new tire was freaking me out a little. Next I gotta adjust the valve clearance, because it sounded like there was some tapping coming from there.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
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A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.

Yamaha has some neat little models of their motorcycles that you can build. Just print out the pdf’s, medicine cut the pieces out, mind
and you can assemble a cool little motorcycle. The YZF-R1 also has a cool toolkit, jack-stand, and other accessories.
That’s on my temporary driver’s license. It means I can legally operate a motorcycle! I was only planning to renew my regular license today, orthopedist
then study the little Motorcyclist’s Handbook before taking the test at a later day, opisthorchiasis
but after waiting an hour at the Texas Department of Public Safety (DMV to you non-Texans), treat I said to myself, “I’m not waiting here again” and I decided to just take the motorcycle test. I figured that the info from the MSF course was still fresh in my mind, so I had a good chance of passing. The test was done on a computer, with 20 total questions. You can skip questions, and they will be repeated later. You only actually need to answer 14 right, so I skipped a bunch, and answered the easy ones first. I then came back to the ones I skipped, answered three of them correctly, and the test ended, indicating that I answered 14 correctly (100% correct) and I passed. Woohoo!
On Saturday, psychotherapist
I woke up bright and early and met my fellow students at “the range” which was the Pflugerville High School parking lot. There, medicine we met the instructor, and those without their own helmets and/or gloves got fitted with ones the class provided. I had my HJC half-helmet and leather gloves, so I was all set. The bikes that they had for us were Kawasaki Eliminators and Honda Rebels. The two students who had the most experience got the two Rebels, which were 250’s, and the rest of us got the Eliminators, which were 125cc machines. In all, there were seven of us, because one of the women from the Thursday night class didn’t show. Anyways, we all got our helmets and gloves on, then got on our bikes. The instructor led us through a quick tour of the bikes, then we “power-walked” our bikes to the staging area, and the actual range.

Our first exercise was power-walking (actually, walking while mounted on the bike, but without actually starting up the engine) across the range, then turning the bike around, then coming back. It was during this first exercise that one of the students, and older lady who I suppose was in her mid-fifties, dropped her bike and had to be helped up. We finished the exercise, then took a break. The lady decided that she needed to take some private lessons before re-taking the MSF class, and called it quits for now. That kind of sucked, because she was so gung-ho before the class, and was the first one at the range that morning, waiting with helmet and gloves.

Anyways, the rest of the morning was spent riding around the range doing a number of drills and learning the basics. It was tons of fun, and really helped, especially learning how to counter-steer. That is incredible, and so easy after a little practice.

In the afternoon, we went to the classroom and finished up our book-studying. At the end, we took a written test, and I scored a perfect 100.

The next day, we met at the range once again at 6:45am. The woman who was a no-show the day before showed up and asked to reschedule. We were wondering what happened to her, but I guess something came up… The Sunday training class wasn’t quite as fun as the first day, because we focused on slow-speed maneouvers (not that the previous day was filled with high speed thrills) and also because it started raining. I had a rain jacket, so I was dry up top, but my pants got soaked.

The training went well, although I had a bit of trouble shifting from first to second. It always happened as I started the exercise and was heading towards the instructor. Later on, I just kept it in second the whole time, including accelerating from a stop. At about noon, we were finished with our training, and it was time for our riding tests. I think there were five skill evaluations, and for each mistake you make, you get one or more points. You are allowed up to 21 points to pass, and I ended up with 11 points. I thought I did better, but oh well… I know where my riding weaknesses are, which are slow right-hand turns, and emergency stopping. :O

In the end, all of us passed, with scores ranging from five up to 16. I got my certificate, a patch, and some coupons for riding gear at the local motorcycle shops. Next step is for me to take the written test at the Texas Dept. of Transportation to get my motorcycle endorsement. Then, I can decide if I want to insure and register my C70. I already have my eye on restoring a bigger bike, a Honda CB350 from the early 70’s. We’ll see…
Last night I went to the first class for the MSF Beginners Course. There were eight students, search including me, ailment
and the rider experience ranged from “used to ride a lot, side effects
but some years ago” to “I only sat on a bike once”. The youngest student was probably about 21, the oldest was nearing 60. Basically, the classroom session was going thru the course book, and answering the test questions, then talking about the answers in more detail. The instructor was very knowledgeable and funny, and had some nice insights. The things we covered from the book were really basic, though, like motorcycle controls, basic operation, and gear. I am really looking forward to the riding portions of the course, which start tomorrow and end on Sunday. It’s going to be fun!

Honda has this cool scooter prototype that runs on gasoline and electric power. Yes, shop
it’s a hybrid scooter! I am not too crazy about the looks, discount
but the concept is cool, and it should get incredible gas mileage. Maybe even better than the ~100mpg my C70 Passport gets!
I put the new tire on the front, capsule
filled it with air, cialis and it seems alright. I also checked the hi-beam light and it works nicely. I took it up to about 35mph tonight, help
I think it will go above 40mph, but I didn’t let it get up to speed. I guess the new tire was freaking me out a little. Next I gotta adjust the valve clearance, because it sounded like there was some tapping coming from there.

Last night I went over to the garage to work on the C70. Although I only have a small space to work in, pulmonologist
it is adequate. Earlier in the week, ambulance I went to Home Depot and bought the materials for my homemade jack-stand. It consisted of two bricks, a bag of dirt, and a tarp. The bricks go on the ground, for height, then part of the tarp, then the bag of dirt, then put the rest of the tarp over it. The tarp is there so that the bag doesn’t puncture. Then I lift the bike onto that pile, and the front wheel is off the ground. The dirt is pliable enough that the bike “settles” into it and is pretty stable. In the future, I’d like to get a center stand, which would make working on the C70 much easier, but the parts for it would cost upwards of $50, so I will just use my “Home Depot Special”.

Anyways, I got a bit of work done. First, I replaced the bulbs in the speedometer, the neutral indicator, and the hi-beam indicator. The panel lights up nicely now. I couldn’t test the hi-beam light yet because I didn’t start the engine, but the neutral light works perfectly. Also, I replaced the air filter, which was all dirty and oily. That was the easy part, and took about 10 minutes.

Next, I disconnected the front brake and speedometer cables, then removed the front wheel. I then removed the broken fender, and tried to line up the replacement I bought a week earlier. Unfortunately, the fender’s mounting holes are off by about 3/4”. It’s secured by four bolts, and the top two line up perfectly, but the bottom two by the wheel hub don’t quite match. I will need to make a bracket or extension of some sort. But for the time being, the top two bolts are holding the fender securely in place. Even if the fender shifts, there is no possibility of it getting stuck on the tire because of the way it is positioned.

Next, I removed the old, cracked tire from the front rim. That was easy. But fitting the new tire on the rim was a pain in the rear. It was not pliable at all, and all attempts to get the bead around the rim were defeated. I was super hot and sweaty too, so I decided to call it a night, and bring the tire back to the apartment and have another go at it the next day. But, after taking a shower, and reading up on the correct way to put the tire back on, I decided to try again. (In the comfort of and air-conditioned room!) The secret trick to putting on a tire of this kind is to put some soap around the rim. Simple as that. A little soap and some elbow grease, and the tire went on relatively easily. My fingers are sore, but the tire is ready to be filled with air. While I have the front wheel off, I am going to replace the brake shoes. But that will wait til tomorrow night.

I can’t wait to take it out for a spin, though! With the new tire in front, I want to take it up to top speed and see how fast it can go.

Things left to be done in the near-term:

Replace rear tire
Replace drive chain
Fix front brake light switch
Make brackets for fender
Change oil

Oh dang, I just remembered I forgot to charge the battery. Oh well, it looked like it still had plenty of juice, but I try to charge it every couple weeks.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.

Yamaha has some neat little models of their motorcycles that you can build. Just print out the pdf’s, medicine cut the pieces out, mind
and you can assemble a cool little motorcycle. The YZF-R1 also has a cool toolkit, jack-stand, and other accessories.
That’s on my temporary driver’s license. It means I can legally operate a motorcycle! I was only planning to renew my regular license today, orthopedist
then study the little Motorcyclist’s Handbook before taking the test at a later day, opisthorchiasis
but after waiting an hour at the Texas Department of Public Safety (DMV to you non-Texans), treat I said to myself, “I’m not waiting here again” and I decided to just take the motorcycle test. I figured that the info from the MSF course was still fresh in my mind, so I had a good chance of passing. The test was done on a computer, with 20 total questions. You can skip questions, and they will be repeated later. You only actually need to answer 14 right, so I skipped a bunch, and answered the easy ones first. I then came back to the ones I skipped, answered three of them correctly, and the test ended, indicating that I answered 14 correctly (100% correct) and I passed. Woohoo!
On Saturday, psychotherapist
I woke up bright and early and met my fellow students at “the range” which was the Pflugerville High School parking lot. There, medicine we met the instructor, and those without their own helmets and/or gloves got fitted with ones the class provided. I had my HJC half-helmet and leather gloves, so I was all set. The bikes that they had for us were Kawasaki Eliminators and Honda Rebels. The two students who had the most experience got the two Rebels, which were 250’s, and the rest of us got the Eliminators, which were 125cc machines. In all, there were seven of us, because one of the women from the Thursday night class didn’t show. Anyways, we all got our helmets and gloves on, then got on our bikes. The instructor led us through a quick tour of the bikes, then we “power-walked” our bikes to the staging area, and the actual range.

Our first exercise was power-walking (actually, walking while mounted on the bike, but without actually starting up the engine) across the range, then turning the bike around, then coming back. It was during this first exercise that one of the students, and older lady who I suppose was in her mid-fifties, dropped her bike and had to be helped up. We finished the exercise, then took a break. The lady decided that she needed to take some private lessons before re-taking the MSF class, and called it quits for now. That kind of sucked, because she was so gung-ho before the class, and was the first one at the range that morning, waiting with helmet and gloves.

Anyways, the rest of the morning was spent riding around the range doing a number of drills and learning the basics. It was tons of fun, and really helped, especially learning how to counter-steer. That is incredible, and so easy after a little practice.

In the afternoon, we went to the classroom and finished up our book-studying. At the end, we took a written test, and I scored a perfect 100.

The next day, we met at the range once again at 6:45am. The woman who was a no-show the day before showed up and asked to reschedule. We were wondering what happened to her, but I guess something came up… The Sunday training class wasn’t quite as fun as the first day, because we focused on slow-speed maneouvers (not that the previous day was filled with high speed thrills) and also because it started raining. I had a rain jacket, so I was dry up top, but my pants got soaked.

The training went well, although I had a bit of trouble shifting from first to second. It always happened as I started the exercise and was heading towards the instructor. Later on, I just kept it in second the whole time, including accelerating from a stop. At about noon, we were finished with our training, and it was time for our riding tests. I think there were five skill evaluations, and for each mistake you make, you get one or more points. You are allowed up to 21 points to pass, and I ended up with 11 points. I thought I did better, but oh well… I know where my riding weaknesses are, which are slow right-hand turns, and emergency stopping. :O

In the end, all of us passed, with scores ranging from five up to 16. I got my certificate, a patch, and some coupons for riding gear at the local motorcycle shops. Next step is for me to take the written test at the Texas Dept. of Transportation to get my motorcycle endorsement. Then, I can decide if I want to insure and register my C70. I already have my eye on restoring a bigger bike, a Honda CB350 from the early 70’s. We’ll see…
Last night I went to the first class for the MSF Beginners Course. There were eight students, search including me, ailment
and the rider experience ranged from “used to ride a lot, side effects
but some years ago” to “I only sat on a bike once”. The youngest student was probably about 21, the oldest was nearing 60. Basically, the classroom session was going thru the course book, and answering the test questions, then talking about the answers in more detail. The instructor was very knowledgeable and funny, and had some nice insights. The things we covered from the book were really basic, though, like motorcycle controls, basic operation, and gear. I am really looking forward to the riding portions of the course, which start tomorrow and end on Sunday. It’s going to be fun!

Honda has this cool scooter prototype that runs on gasoline and electric power. Yes, shop
it’s a hybrid scooter! I am not too crazy about the looks, discount
but the concept is cool, and it should get incredible gas mileage. Maybe even better than the ~100mpg my C70 Passport gets!
I put the new tire on the front, capsule
filled it with air, cialis and it seems alright. I also checked the hi-beam light and it works nicely. I took it up to about 35mph tonight, help
I think it will go above 40mph, but I didn’t let it get up to speed. I guess the new tire was freaking me out a little. Next I gotta adjust the valve clearance, because it sounded like there was some tapping coming from there.

Last night I went over to the garage to work on the C70. Although I only have a small space to work in, pulmonologist
it is adequate. Earlier in the week, ambulance I went to Home Depot and bought the materials for my homemade jack-stand. It consisted of two bricks, a bag of dirt, and a tarp. The bricks go on the ground, for height, then part of the tarp, then the bag of dirt, then put the rest of the tarp over it. The tarp is there so that the bag doesn’t puncture. Then I lift the bike onto that pile, and the front wheel is off the ground. The dirt is pliable enough that the bike “settles” into it and is pretty stable. In the future, I’d like to get a center stand, which would make working on the C70 much easier, but the parts for it would cost upwards of $50, so I will just use my “Home Depot Special”.

Anyways, I got a bit of work done. First, I replaced the bulbs in the speedometer, the neutral indicator, and the hi-beam indicator. The panel lights up nicely now. I couldn’t test the hi-beam light yet because I didn’t start the engine, but the neutral light works perfectly. Also, I replaced the air filter, which was all dirty and oily. That was the easy part, and took about 10 minutes.

Next, I disconnected the front brake and speedometer cables, then removed the front wheel. I then removed the broken fender, and tried to line up the replacement I bought a week earlier. Unfortunately, the fender’s mounting holes are off by about 3/4”. It’s secured by four bolts, and the top two line up perfectly, but the bottom two by the wheel hub don’t quite match. I will need to make a bracket or extension of some sort. But for the time being, the top two bolts are holding the fender securely in place. Even if the fender shifts, there is no possibility of it getting stuck on the tire because of the way it is positioned.

Next, I removed the old, cracked tire from the front rim. That was easy. But fitting the new tire on the rim was a pain in the rear. It was not pliable at all, and all attempts to get the bead around the rim were defeated. I was super hot and sweaty too, so I decided to call it a night, and bring the tire back to the apartment and have another go at it the next day. But, after taking a shower, and reading up on the correct way to put the tire back on, I decided to try again. (In the comfort of and air-conditioned room!) The secret trick to putting on a tire of this kind is to put some soap around the rim. Simple as that. A little soap and some elbow grease, and the tire went on relatively easily. My fingers are sore, but the tire is ready to be filled with air. While I have the front wheel off, I am going to replace the brake shoes. But that will wait til tomorrow night.

I can’t wait to take it out for a spin, though! With the new tire in front, I want to take it up to top speed and see how fast it can go.

Things left to be done in the near-term:

Replace rear tire
Replace drive chain
Fix front brake light switch
Make brackets for fender
Change oil

Oh dang, I just remembered I forgot to charge the battery. Oh well, it looked like it still had plenty of juice, but I try to charge it every couple weeks.

While doing a Google search on “Honda C70” last night, clinic
I stumbled upon the Mad Bastard Scooter Rally ‘04, buy cialis
put together by CMG, a Canadian motorbike online magazine. I love to read stories like this. A group of several (6?) scooterists go on an endurance rally around Lake Ontario on scooters, including a Yellow 1981 Honda C70! I won’t give away the ending, whether they made it or not, but it’s a pretty cool story. You can also read about the ‘05 Rally here, although no C70’s made the trip in ‘05.

I have a fascination about motorbike journeys, and have been reading “Long Way Round” by Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman. Someday I’d like to take an extended trip on a bike too. Seems like a neat experience.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.

Yamaha has some neat little models of their motorcycles that you can build. Just print out the pdf’s, medicine cut the pieces out, mind
and you can assemble a cool little motorcycle. The YZF-R1 also has a cool toolkit, jack-stand, and other accessories.
That’s on my temporary driver’s license. It means I can legally operate a motorcycle! I was only planning to renew my regular license today, orthopedist
then study the little Motorcyclist’s Handbook before taking the test at a later day, opisthorchiasis
but after waiting an hour at the Texas Department of Public Safety (DMV to you non-Texans), treat I said to myself, “I’m not waiting here again” and I decided to just take the motorcycle test. I figured that the info from the MSF course was still fresh in my mind, so I had a good chance of passing. The test was done on a computer, with 20 total questions. You can skip questions, and they will be repeated later. You only actually need to answer 14 right, so I skipped a bunch, and answered the easy ones first. I then came back to the ones I skipped, answered three of them correctly, and the test ended, indicating that I answered 14 correctly (100% correct) and I passed. Woohoo!
On Saturday, psychotherapist
I woke up bright and early and met my fellow students at “the range” which was the Pflugerville High School parking lot. There, medicine we met the instructor, and those without their own helmets and/or gloves got fitted with ones the class provided. I had my HJC half-helmet and leather gloves, so I was all set. The bikes that they had for us were Kawasaki Eliminators and Honda Rebels. The two students who had the most experience got the two Rebels, which were 250’s, and the rest of us got the Eliminators, which were 125cc machines. In all, there were seven of us, because one of the women from the Thursday night class didn’t show. Anyways, we all got our helmets and gloves on, then got on our bikes. The instructor led us through a quick tour of the bikes, then we “power-walked” our bikes to the staging area, and the actual range.

Our first exercise was power-walking (actually, walking while mounted on the bike, but without actually starting up the engine) across the range, then turning the bike around, then coming back. It was during this first exercise that one of the students, and older lady who I suppose was in her mid-fifties, dropped her bike and had to be helped up. We finished the exercise, then took a break. The lady decided that she needed to take some private lessons before re-taking the MSF class, and called it quits for now. That kind of sucked, because she was so gung-ho before the class, and was the first one at the range that morning, waiting with helmet and gloves.

Anyways, the rest of the morning was spent riding around the range doing a number of drills and learning the basics. It was tons of fun, and really helped, especially learning how to counter-steer. That is incredible, and so easy after a little practice.

In the afternoon, we went to the classroom and finished up our book-studying. At the end, we took a written test, and I scored a perfect 100.

The next day, we met at the range once again at 6:45am. The woman who was a no-show the day before showed up and asked to reschedule. We were wondering what happened to her, but I guess something came up… The Sunday training class wasn’t quite as fun as the first day, because we focused on slow-speed maneouvers (not that the previous day was filled with high speed thrills) and also because it started raining. I had a rain jacket, so I was dry up top, but my pants got soaked.

The training went well, although I had a bit of trouble shifting from first to second. It always happened as I started the exercise and was heading towards the instructor. Later on, I just kept it in second the whole time, including accelerating from a stop. At about noon, we were finished with our training, and it was time for our riding tests. I think there were five skill evaluations, and for each mistake you make, you get one or more points. You are allowed up to 21 points to pass, and I ended up with 11 points. I thought I did better, but oh well… I know where my riding weaknesses are, which are slow right-hand turns, and emergency stopping. :O

In the end, all of us passed, with scores ranging from five up to 16. I got my certificate, a patch, and some coupons for riding gear at the local motorcycle shops. Next step is for me to take the written test at the Texas Dept. of Transportation to get my motorcycle endorsement. Then, I can decide if I want to insure and register my C70. I already have my eye on restoring a bigger bike, a Honda CB350 from the early 70’s. We’ll see…
Last night I went to the first class for the MSF Beginners Course. There were eight students, search including me, ailment
and the rider experience ranged from “used to ride a lot, side effects
but some years ago” to “I only sat on a bike once”. The youngest student was probably about 21, the oldest was nearing 60. Basically, the classroom session was going thru the course book, and answering the test questions, then talking about the answers in more detail. The instructor was very knowledgeable and funny, and had some nice insights. The things we covered from the book were really basic, though, like motorcycle controls, basic operation, and gear. I am really looking forward to the riding portions of the course, which start tomorrow and end on Sunday. It’s going to be fun!

Honda has this cool scooter prototype that runs on gasoline and electric power. Yes, shop
it’s a hybrid scooter! I am not too crazy about the looks, discount
but the concept is cool, and it should get incredible gas mileage. Maybe even better than the ~100mpg my C70 Passport gets!
I put the new tire on the front, capsule
filled it with air, cialis and it seems alright. I also checked the hi-beam light and it works nicely. I took it up to about 35mph tonight, help
I think it will go above 40mph, but I didn’t let it get up to speed. I guess the new tire was freaking me out a little. Next I gotta adjust the valve clearance, because it sounded like there was some tapping coming from there.

Last night I went over to the garage to work on the C70. Although I only have a small space to work in, pulmonologist
it is adequate. Earlier in the week, ambulance I went to Home Depot and bought the materials for my homemade jack-stand. It consisted of two bricks, a bag of dirt, and a tarp. The bricks go on the ground, for height, then part of the tarp, then the bag of dirt, then put the rest of the tarp over it. The tarp is there so that the bag doesn’t puncture. Then I lift the bike onto that pile, and the front wheel is off the ground. The dirt is pliable enough that the bike “settles” into it and is pretty stable. In the future, I’d like to get a center stand, which would make working on the C70 much easier, but the parts for it would cost upwards of $50, so I will just use my “Home Depot Special”.

Anyways, I got a bit of work done. First, I replaced the bulbs in the speedometer, the neutral indicator, and the hi-beam indicator. The panel lights up nicely now. I couldn’t test the hi-beam light yet because I didn’t start the engine, but the neutral light works perfectly. Also, I replaced the air filter, which was all dirty and oily. That was the easy part, and took about 10 minutes.

Next, I disconnected the front brake and speedometer cables, then removed the front wheel. I then removed the broken fender, and tried to line up the replacement I bought a week earlier. Unfortunately, the fender’s mounting holes are off by about 3/4”. It’s secured by four bolts, and the top two line up perfectly, but the bottom two by the wheel hub don’t quite match. I will need to make a bracket or extension of some sort. But for the time being, the top two bolts are holding the fender securely in place. Even if the fender shifts, there is no possibility of it getting stuck on the tire because of the way it is positioned.

Next, I removed the old, cracked tire from the front rim. That was easy. But fitting the new tire on the rim was a pain in the rear. It was not pliable at all, and all attempts to get the bead around the rim were defeated. I was super hot and sweaty too, so I decided to call it a night, and bring the tire back to the apartment and have another go at it the next day. But, after taking a shower, and reading up on the correct way to put the tire back on, I decided to try again. (In the comfort of and air-conditioned room!) The secret trick to putting on a tire of this kind is to put some soap around the rim. Simple as that. A little soap and some elbow grease, and the tire went on relatively easily. My fingers are sore, but the tire is ready to be filled with air. While I have the front wheel off, I am going to replace the brake shoes. But that will wait til tomorrow night.

I can’t wait to take it out for a spin, though! With the new tire in front, I want to take it up to top speed and see how fast it can go.

Things left to be done in the near-term:

Replace rear tire
Replace drive chain
Fix front brake light switch
Make brackets for fender
Change oil

Oh dang, I just remembered I forgot to charge the battery. Oh well, it looked like it still had plenty of juice, but I try to charge it every couple weeks.

While doing a Google search on “Honda C70” last night, clinic
I stumbled upon the Mad Bastard Scooter Rally ‘04, buy cialis
put together by CMG, a Canadian motorbike online magazine. I love to read stories like this. A group of several (6?) scooterists go on an endurance rally around Lake Ontario on scooters, including a Yellow 1981 Honda C70! I won’t give away the ending, whether they made it or not, but it’s a pretty cool story. You can also read about the ‘05 Rally here, although no C70’s made the trip in ‘05.

I have a fascination about motorbike journeys, and have been reading “Long Way Round” by Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman. Someday I’d like to take an extended trip on a bike too. Seems like a neat experience.
Supercub Ad

The fender that arrived for my C70 should fit on nicely. The mounting holes on the top are placed differently than on the original fender, try
but the forks actually have bolts in the correct place for the replacement fender as well, view so it should work out. The only problem is that I only have about an 8’x4’ space to work on it in the garage. The rest of the garage is filled with our moving stuff. I need to stop by Home Depot to buy some bags of dirt to make my homemade motorbike jack to lift the front of the bike up. Then I can change the front tire, adiposity
and replace the fender at the same time. Speaking of the fender, the color turns out to be a really nice dark greyish-blue. It is actually one of the colors I was thinking of painting the bike, so I guess it’s decided. I shouldn’t have any problem finding a matching color at the auto parts store. The photo above is what my bike will look like. I am even going to paint the side covers white to match the legshield. I just need to search for a luggage rack like the one in the photo, but it shouldn’t be too hard to find since they are still produced in Japan.

The other night I decided to take the C70 out for another spin. The cub turned over and started right up, but then it died after about half a minute. I couldn’t get it started again, so I wheeled it back towards the garage. Before I actually put it in, I decided to try one last time, and lo and behold, it started up. This time, the bike’s weight and/or metal mass was enough to trip the entrance gate, so I was cruising around the neighborhood in no time. It was about 85°F out, so the wind felt really good. It is so much fun to ride, even if it’s only at a rather tame 30mph. I think it could probably hit 40mph easy, but I will wait until I put on the new tires before I try. I also need to get a new chain, because the one that is on it now is stretched and rubbing against the chain guard. I also fixed the right rear signal: the bulb wasn’t contacting the wire properly. Anyways, the ride was tons of fun. I rode around the old neighborhood, since it is not busy at all and I can have the whole road to myself. I am getting used to riding it, and shifting is becoming second nature. My friend Chris told me a bit about the correct way to apply pressure to the brake on a motorcycle, so I kept that in mind when slowing down at the stop signs.

The list of things to do are:

Fix speedometer bulbs
Fix front brake lever switch
Replace chain
Adjust pistons
Replace tires
Replace fender
Replace petcock
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
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This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
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A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.

Yamaha has some neat little models of their motorcycles that you can build. Just print out the pdf’s, medicine cut the pieces out, mind
and you can assemble a cool little motorcycle. The YZF-R1 also has a cool toolkit, jack-stand, and other accessories.
That’s on my temporary driver’s license. It means I can legally operate a motorcycle! I was only planning to renew my regular license today, orthopedist
then study the little Motorcyclist’s Handbook before taking the test at a later day, opisthorchiasis
but after waiting an hour at the Texas Department of Public Safety (DMV to you non-Texans), treat I said to myself, “I’m not waiting here again” and I decided to just take the motorcycle test. I figured that the info from the MSF course was still fresh in my mind, so I had a good chance of passing. The test was done on a computer, with 20 total questions. You can skip questions, and they will be repeated later. You only actually need to answer 14 right, so I skipped a bunch, and answered the easy ones first. I then came back to the ones I skipped, answered three of them correctly, and the test ended, indicating that I answered 14 correctly (100% correct) and I passed. Woohoo!
On Saturday, psychotherapist
I woke up bright and early and met my fellow students at “the range” which was the Pflugerville High School parking lot. There, medicine we met the instructor, and those without their own helmets and/or gloves got fitted with ones the class provided. I had my HJC half-helmet and leather gloves, so I was all set. The bikes that they had for us were Kawasaki Eliminators and Honda Rebels. The two students who had the most experience got the two Rebels, which were 250’s, and the rest of us got the Eliminators, which were 125cc machines. In all, there were seven of us, because one of the women from the Thursday night class didn’t show. Anyways, we all got our helmets and gloves on, then got on our bikes. The instructor led us through a quick tour of the bikes, then we “power-walked” our bikes to the staging area, and the actual range.

Our first exercise was power-walking (actually, walking while mounted on the bike, but without actually starting up the engine) across the range, then turning the bike around, then coming back. It was during this first exercise that one of the students, and older lady who I suppose was in her mid-fifties, dropped her bike and had to be helped up. We finished the exercise, then took a break. The lady decided that she needed to take some private lessons before re-taking the MSF class, and called it quits for now. That kind of sucked, because she was so gung-ho before the class, and was the first one at the range that morning, waiting with helmet and gloves.

Anyways, the rest of the morning was spent riding around the range doing a number of drills and learning the basics. It was tons of fun, and really helped, especially learning how to counter-steer. That is incredible, and so easy after a little practice.

In the afternoon, we went to the classroom and finished up our book-studying. At the end, we took a written test, and I scored a perfect 100.

The next day, we met at the range once again at 6:45am. The woman who was a no-show the day before showed up and asked to reschedule. We were wondering what happened to her, but I guess something came up… The Sunday training class wasn’t quite as fun as the first day, because we focused on slow-speed maneouvers (not that the previous day was filled with high speed thrills) and also because it started raining. I had a rain jacket, so I was dry up top, but my pants got soaked.

The training went well, although I had a bit of trouble shifting from first to second. It always happened as I started the exercise and was heading towards the instructor. Later on, I just kept it in second the whole time, including accelerating from a stop. At about noon, we were finished with our training, and it was time for our riding tests. I think there were five skill evaluations, and for each mistake you make, you get one or more points. You are allowed up to 21 points to pass, and I ended up with 11 points. I thought I did better, but oh well… I know where my riding weaknesses are, which are slow right-hand turns, and emergency stopping. :O

In the end, all of us passed, with scores ranging from five up to 16. I got my certificate, a patch, and some coupons for riding gear at the local motorcycle shops. Next step is for me to take the written test at the Texas Dept. of Transportation to get my motorcycle endorsement. Then, I can decide if I want to insure and register my C70. I already have my eye on restoring a bigger bike, a Honda CB350 from the early 70’s. We’ll see…
Last night I went to the first class for the MSF Beginners Course. There were eight students, search including me, ailment
and the rider experience ranged from “used to ride a lot, side effects
but some years ago” to “I only sat on a bike once”. The youngest student was probably about 21, the oldest was nearing 60. Basically, the classroom session was going thru the course book, and answering the test questions, then talking about the answers in more detail. The instructor was very knowledgeable and funny, and had some nice insights. The things we covered from the book were really basic, though, like motorcycle controls, basic operation, and gear. I am really looking forward to the riding portions of the course, which start tomorrow and end on Sunday. It’s going to be fun!

Honda has this cool scooter prototype that runs on gasoline and electric power. Yes, shop
it’s a hybrid scooter! I am not too crazy about the looks, discount
but the concept is cool, and it should get incredible gas mileage. Maybe even better than the ~100mpg my C70 Passport gets!
I put the new tire on the front, capsule
filled it with air, cialis and it seems alright. I also checked the hi-beam light and it works nicely. I took it up to about 35mph tonight, help
I think it will go above 40mph, but I didn’t let it get up to speed. I guess the new tire was freaking me out a little. Next I gotta adjust the valve clearance, because it sounded like there was some tapping coming from there.

Last night I went over to the garage to work on the C70. Although I only have a small space to work in, pulmonologist
it is adequate. Earlier in the week, ambulance I went to Home Depot and bought the materials for my homemade jack-stand. It consisted of two bricks, a bag of dirt, and a tarp. The bricks go on the ground, for height, then part of the tarp, then the bag of dirt, then put the rest of the tarp over it. The tarp is there so that the bag doesn’t puncture. Then I lift the bike onto that pile, and the front wheel is off the ground. The dirt is pliable enough that the bike “settles” into it and is pretty stable. In the future, I’d like to get a center stand, which would make working on the C70 much easier, but the parts for it would cost upwards of $50, so I will just use my “Home Depot Special”.

Anyways, I got a bit of work done. First, I replaced the bulbs in the speedometer, the neutral indicator, and the hi-beam indicator. The panel lights up nicely now. I couldn’t test the hi-beam light yet because I didn’t start the engine, but the neutral light works perfectly. Also, I replaced the air filter, which was all dirty and oily. That was the easy part, and took about 10 minutes.

Next, I disconnected the front brake and speedometer cables, then removed the front wheel. I then removed the broken fender, and tried to line up the replacement I bought a week earlier. Unfortunately, the fender’s mounting holes are off by about 3/4”. It’s secured by four bolts, and the top two line up perfectly, but the bottom two by the wheel hub don’t quite match. I will need to make a bracket or extension of some sort. But for the time being, the top two bolts are holding the fender securely in place. Even if the fender shifts, there is no possibility of it getting stuck on the tire because of the way it is positioned.

Next, I removed the old, cracked tire from the front rim. That was easy. But fitting the new tire on the rim was a pain in the rear. It was not pliable at all, and all attempts to get the bead around the rim were defeated. I was super hot and sweaty too, so I decided to call it a night, and bring the tire back to the apartment and have another go at it the next day. But, after taking a shower, and reading up on the correct way to put the tire back on, I decided to try again. (In the comfort of and air-conditioned room!) The secret trick to putting on a tire of this kind is to put some soap around the rim. Simple as that. A little soap and some elbow grease, and the tire went on relatively easily. My fingers are sore, but the tire is ready to be filled with air. While I have the front wheel off, I am going to replace the brake shoes. But that will wait til tomorrow night.

I can’t wait to take it out for a spin, though! With the new tire in front, I want to take it up to top speed and see how fast it can go.

Things left to be done in the near-term:

Replace rear tire
Replace drive chain
Fix front brake light switch
Make brackets for fender
Change oil

Oh dang, I just remembered I forgot to charge the battery. Oh well, it looked like it still had plenty of juice, but I try to charge it every couple weeks.

While doing a Google search on “Honda C70” last night, clinic
I stumbled upon the Mad Bastard Scooter Rally ‘04, buy cialis
put together by CMG, a Canadian motorbike online magazine. I love to read stories like this. A group of several (6?) scooterists go on an endurance rally around Lake Ontario on scooters, including a Yellow 1981 Honda C70! I won’t give away the ending, whether they made it or not, but it’s a pretty cool story. You can also read about the ‘05 Rally here, although no C70’s made the trip in ‘05.

I have a fascination about motorbike journeys, and have been reading “Long Way Round” by Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman. Someday I’d like to take an extended trip on a bike too. Seems like a neat experience.
Supercub Ad

The fender that arrived for my C70 should fit on nicely. The mounting holes on the top are placed differently than on the original fender, try
but the forks actually have bolts in the correct place for the replacement fender as well, view so it should work out. The only problem is that I only have about an 8’x4’ space to work on it in the garage. The rest of the garage is filled with our moving stuff. I need to stop by Home Depot to buy some bags of dirt to make my homemade motorbike jack to lift the front of the bike up. Then I can change the front tire, adiposity
and replace the fender at the same time. Speaking of the fender, the color turns out to be a really nice dark greyish-blue. It is actually one of the colors I was thinking of painting the bike, so I guess it’s decided. I shouldn’t have any problem finding a matching color at the auto parts store. The photo above is what my bike will look like. I am even going to paint the side covers white to match the legshield. I just need to search for a luggage rack like the one in the photo, but it shouldn’t be too hard to find since they are still produced in Japan.

The other night I decided to take the C70 out for another spin. The cub turned over and started right up, but then it died after about half a minute. I couldn’t get it started again, so I wheeled it back towards the garage. Before I actually put it in, I decided to try one last time, and lo and behold, it started up. This time, the bike’s weight and/or metal mass was enough to trip the entrance gate, so I was cruising around the neighborhood in no time. It was about 85°F out, so the wind felt really good. It is so much fun to ride, even if it’s only at a rather tame 30mph. I think it could probably hit 40mph easy, but I will wait until I put on the new tires before I try. I also need to get a new chain, because the one that is on it now is stretched and rubbing against the chain guard. I also fixed the right rear signal: the bulb wasn’t contacting the wire properly. Anyways, the ride was tons of fun. I rode around the old neighborhood, since it is not busy at all and I can have the whole road to myself. I am getting used to riding it, and shifting is becoming second nature. My friend Chris told me a bit about the correct way to apply pressure to the brake on a motorcycle, so I kept that in mind when slowing down at the stop signs.

The list of things to do are:

Fix speedometer bulbs
Fix front brake lever switch
Replace chain
Adjust pistons
Replace tires
Replace fender
Replace petcock

I moved my bike from the balcony closet to the garage last night. I figured I would take a picture of it while it was in the livingroom. Before I took it to the garage, capsule
I went for a little spin around the neighborhood. I learned a couple things… first, anesthetist
the bike is not big enough to trip the parking gates. I had to wait for a car to come along and open them. Second, remedy
the light for the speedometer is out. It probably just needs a bulb.

When I came back to the parking lot, I met a fellow tenant who was getting off of his Yamaha YZF-R6. We chatted a bit about our bikes and he took a photo of my C70 with his camera phone. It turns out that he had never ridden a motorcycle before he bought his, just a few months ago. He said his friend had one, so he got one too. He didn’t take the MSF class, and failed his written test, so he has to go back tomorrow to retake it. Speaking of the MSF class, I am going to take it in a month or so. It should be really fun.
capsule
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A funny Supercub CM!
medical
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This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
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Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
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A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.

Yamaha has some neat little models of their motorcycles that you can build. Just print out the pdf’s, medicine cut the pieces out, mind
and you can assemble a cool little motorcycle. The YZF-R1 also has a cool toolkit, jack-stand, and other accessories.
That’s on my temporary driver’s license. It means I can legally operate a motorcycle! I was only planning to renew my regular license today, orthopedist
then study the little Motorcyclist’s Handbook before taking the test at a later day, opisthorchiasis
but after waiting an hour at the Texas Department of Public Safety (DMV to you non-Texans), treat I said to myself, “I’m not waiting here again” and I decided to just take the motorcycle test. I figured that the info from the MSF course was still fresh in my mind, so I had a good chance of passing. The test was done on a computer, with 20 total questions. You can skip questions, and they will be repeated later. You only actually need to answer 14 right, so I skipped a bunch, and answered the easy ones first. I then came back to the ones I skipped, answered three of them correctly, and the test ended, indicating that I answered 14 correctly (100% correct) and I passed. Woohoo!
On Saturday, psychotherapist
I woke up bright and early and met my fellow students at “the range” which was the Pflugerville High School parking lot. There, medicine we met the instructor, and those without their own helmets and/or gloves got fitted with ones the class provided. I had my HJC half-helmet and leather gloves, so I was all set. The bikes that they had for us were Kawasaki Eliminators and Honda Rebels. The two students who had the most experience got the two Rebels, which were 250’s, and the rest of us got the Eliminators, which were 125cc machines. In all, there were seven of us, because one of the women from the Thursday night class didn’t show. Anyways, we all got our helmets and gloves on, then got on our bikes. The instructor led us through a quick tour of the bikes, then we “power-walked” our bikes to the staging area, and the actual range.

Our first exercise was power-walking (actually, walking while mounted on the bike, but without actually starting up the engine) across the range, then turning the bike around, then coming back. It was during this first exercise that one of the students, and older lady who I suppose was in her mid-fifties, dropped her bike and had to be helped up. We finished the exercise, then took a break. The lady decided that she needed to take some private lessons before re-taking the MSF class, and called it quits for now. That kind of sucked, because she was so gung-ho before the class, and was the first one at the range that morning, waiting with helmet and gloves.

Anyways, the rest of the morning was spent riding around the range doing a number of drills and learning the basics. It was tons of fun, and really helped, especially learning how to counter-steer. That is incredible, and so easy after a little practice.

In the afternoon, we went to the classroom and finished up our book-studying. At the end, we took a written test, and I scored a perfect 100.

The next day, we met at the range once again at 6:45am. The woman who was a no-show the day before showed up and asked to reschedule. We were wondering what happened to her, but I guess something came up… The Sunday training class wasn’t quite as fun as the first day, because we focused on slow-speed maneouvers (not that the previous day was filled with high speed thrills) and also because it started raining. I had a rain jacket, so I was dry up top, but my pants got soaked.

The training went well, although I had a bit of trouble shifting from first to second. It always happened as I started the exercise and was heading towards the instructor. Later on, I just kept it in second the whole time, including accelerating from a stop. At about noon, we were finished with our training, and it was time for our riding tests. I think there were five skill evaluations, and for each mistake you make, you get one or more points. You are allowed up to 21 points to pass, and I ended up with 11 points. I thought I did better, but oh well… I know where my riding weaknesses are, which are slow right-hand turns, and emergency stopping. :O

In the end, all of us passed, with scores ranging from five up to 16. I got my certificate, a patch, and some coupons for riding gear at the local motorcycle shops. Next step is for me to take the written test at the Texas Dept. of Transportation to get my motorcycle endorsement. Then, I can decide if I want to insure and register my C70. I already have my eye on restoring a bigger bike, a Honda CB350 from the early 70’s. We’ll see…
Last night I went to the first class for the MSF Beginners Course. There were eight students, search including me, ailment
and the rider experience ranged from “used to ride a lot, side effects
but some years ago” to “I only sat on a bike once”. The youngest student was probably about 21, the oldest was nearing 60. Basically, the classroom session was going thru the course book, and answering the test questions, then talking about the answers in more detail. The instructor was very knowledgeable and funny, and had some nice insights. The things we covered from the book were really basic, though, like motorcycle controls, basic operation, and gear. I am really looking forward to the riding portions of the course, which start tomorrow and end on Sunday. It’s going to be fun!

Honda has this cool scooter prototype that runs on gasoline and electric power. Yes, shop
it’s a hybrid scooter! I am not too crazy about the looks, discount
but the concept is cool, and it should get incredible gas mileage. Maybe even better than the ~100mpg my C70 Passport gets!
I put the new tire on the front, capsule
filled it with air, cialis and it seems alright. I also checked the hi-beam light and it works nicely. I took it up to about 35mph tonight, help
I think it will go above 40mph, but I didn’t let it get up to speed. I guess the new tire was freaking me out a little. Next I gotta adjust the valve clearance, because it sounded like there was some tapping coming from there.

Last night I went over to the garage to work on the C70. Although I only have a small space to work in, pulmonologist
it is adequate. Earlier in the week, ambulance I went to Home Depot and bought the materials for my homemade jack-stand. It consisted of two bricks, a bag of dirt, and a tarp. The bricks go on the ground, for height, then part of the tarp, then the bag of dirt, then put the rest of the tarp over it. The tarp is there so that the bag doesn’t puncture. Then I lift the bike onto that pile, and the front wheel is off the ground. The dirt is pliable enough that the bike “settles” into it and is pretty stable. In the future, I’d like to get a center stand, which would make working on the C70 much easier, but the parts for it would cost upwards of $50, so I will just use my “Home Depot Special”.

Anyways, I got a bit of work done. First, I replaced the bulbs in the speedometer, the neutral indicator, and the hi-beam indicator. The panel lights up nicely now. I couldn’t test the hi-beam light yet because I didn’t start the engine, but the neutral light works perfectly. Also, I replaced the air filter, which was all dirty and oily. That was the easy part, and took about 10 minutes.

Next, I disconnected the front brake and speedometer cables, then removed the front wheel. I then removed the broken fender, and tried to line up the replacement I bought a week earlier. Unfortunately, the fender’s mounting holes are off by about 3/4”. It’s secured by four bolts, and the top two line up perfectly, but the bottom two by the wheel hub don’t quite match. I will need to make a bracket or extension of some sort. But for the time being, the top two bolts are holding the fender securely in place. Even if the fender shifts, there is no possibility of it getting stuck on the tire because of the way it is positioned.

Next, I removed the old, cracked tire from the front rim. That was easy. But fitting the new tire on the rim was a pain in the rear. It was not pliable at all, and all attempts to get the bead around the rim were defeated. I was super hot and sweaty too, so I decided to call it a night, and bring the tire back to the apartment and have another go at it the next day. But, after taking a shower, and reading up on the correct way to put the tire back on, I decided to try again. (In the comfort of and air-conditioned room!) The secret trick to putting on a tire of this kind is to put some soap around the rim. Simple as that. A little soap and some elbow grease, and the tire went on relatively easily. My fingers are sore, but the tire is ready to be filled with air. While I have the front wheel off, I am going to replace the brake shoes. But that will wait til tomorrow night.

I can’t wait to take it out for a spin, though! With the new tire in front, I want to take it up to top speed and see how fast it can go.

Things left to be done in the near-term:

Replace rear tire
Replace drive chain
Fix front brake light switch
Make brackets for fender
Change oil

Oh dang, I just remembered I forgot to charge the battery. Oh well, it looked like it still had plenty of juice, but I try to charge it every couple weeks.

While doing a Google search on “Honda C70” last night, clinic
I stumbled upon the Mad Bastard Scooter Rally ‘04, buy cialis
put together by CMG, a Canadian motorbike online magazine. I love to read stories like this. A group of several (6?) scooterists go on an endurance rally around Lake Ontario on scooters, including a Yellow 1981 Honda C70! I won’t give away the ending, whether they made it or not, but it’s a pretty cool story. You can also read about the ‘05 Rally here, although no C70’s made the trip in ‘05.

I have a fascination about motorbike journeys, and have been reading “Long Way Round” by Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman. Someday I’d like to take an extended trip on a bike too. Seems like a neat experience.
Supercub Ad

The fender that arrived for my C70 should fit on nicely. The mounting holes on the top are placed differently than on the original fender, try
but the forks actually have bolts in the correct place for the replacement fender as well, view so it should work out. The only problem is that I only have about an 8’x4’ space to work on it in the garage. The rest of the garage is filled with our moving stuff. I need to stop by Home Depot to buy some bags of dirt to make my homemade motorbike jack to lift the front of the bike up. Then I can change the front tire, adiposity
and replace the fender at the same time. Speaking of the fender, the color turns out to be a really nice dark greyish-blue. It is actually one of the colors I was thinking of painting the bike, so I guess it’s decided. I shouldn’t have any problem finding a matching color at the auto parts store. The photo above is what my bike will look like. I am even going to paint the side covers white to match the legshield. I just need to search for a luggage rack like the one in the photo, but it shouldn’t be too hard to find since they are still produced in Japan.

The other night I decided to take the C70 out for another spin. The cub turned over and started right up, but then it died after about half a minute. I couldn’t get it started again, so I wheeled it back towards the garage. Before I actually put it in, I decided to try one last time, and lo and behold, it started up. This time, the bike’s weight and/or metal mass was enough to trip the entrance gate, so I was cruising around the neighborhood in no time. It was about 85°F out, so the wind felt really good. It is so much fun to ride, even if it’s only at a rather tame 30mph. I think it could probably hit 40mph easy, but I will wait until I put on the new tires before I try. I also need to get a new chain, because the one that is on it now is stretched and rubbing against the chain guard. I also fixed the right rear signal: the bulb wasn’t contacting the wire properly. Anyways, the ride was tons of fun. I rode around the old neighborhood, since it is not busy at all and I can have the whole road to myself. I am getting used to riding it, and shifting is becoming second nature. My friend Chris told me a bit about the correct way to apply pressure to the brake on a motorcycle, so I kept that in mind when slowing down at the stop signs.

The list of things to do are:

Fix speedometer bulbs
Fix front brake lever switch
Replace chain
Adjust pistons
Replace tires
Replace fender
Replace petcock

I moved my bike from the balcony closet to the garage last night. I figured I would take a picture of it while it was in the livingroom. Before I took it to the garage, capsule
I went for a little spin around the neighborhood. I learned a couple things… first, anesthetist
the bike is not big enough to trip the parking gates. I had to wait for a car to come along and open them. Second, remedy
the light for the speedometer is out. It probably just needs a bulb.

When I came back to the parking lot, I met a fellow tenant who was getting off of his Yamaha YZF-R6. We chatted a bit about our bikes and he took a photo of my C70 with his camera phone. It turns out that he had never ridden a motorcycle before he bought his, just a few months ago. He said his friend had one, so he got one too. He didn’t take the MSF class, and failed his written test, so he has to go back tomorrow to retake it. Speaking of the MSF class, I am going to take it in a month or so. It should be really fun.

I found a blue fender for a C100 cub on Ebay today. It should fit my bike, view but may need some slight modifications, which might be as simple as drilling a couple holes in it. The C70 has I think five plastic body parts: the legshield, front fender, left side cover, right side cover, and lower handlebar cover. With the exception of the handlebar cover, all of those have some sort of damage to them on my bike. The side covers just have small hairline cracks, but I can live with those. The legshield is cracked in a few places, and I will eventually replace it, but am in no rush. The front fender had a crack in the very back, and it was ok, but then during the move, the fertilizer spreader in the garage fell back, and the handle whacked the fender right on top. It actually punched a hole through the top, and cracked it pretty good. I taped it up with packing tape, but it looks pretty bad. Hopefully the new fender will work out nicely.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
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Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
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A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.

Yamaha has some neat little models of their motorcycles that you can build. Just print out the pdf’s, medicine cut the pieces out, mind
and you can assemble a cool little motorcycle. The YZF-R1 also has a cool toolkit, jack-stand, and other accessories.
That’s on my temporary driver’s license. It means I can legally operate a motorcycle! I was only planning to renew my regular license today, orthopedist
then study the little Motorcyclist’s Handbook before taking the test at a later day, opisthorchiasis
but after waiting an hour at the Texas Department of Public Safety (DMV to you non-Texans), treat I said to myself, “I’m not waiting here again” and I decided to just take the motorcycle test. I figured that the info from the MSF course was still fresh in my mind, so I had a good chance of passing. The test was done on a computer, with 20 total questions. You can skip questions, and they will be repeated later. You only actually need to answer 14 right, so I skipped a bunch, and answered the easy ones first. I then came back to the ones I skipped, answered three of them correctly, and the test ended, indicating that I answered 14 correctly (100% correct) and I passed. Woohoo!
On Saturday, psychotherapist
I woke up bright and early and met my fellow students at “the range” which was the Pflugerville High School parking lot. There, medicine we met the instructor, and those without their own helmets and/or gloves got fitted with ones the class provided. I had my HJC half-helmet and leather gloves, so I was all set. The bikes that they had for us were Kawasaki Eliminators and Honda Rebels. The two students who had the most experience got the two Rebels, which were 250’s, and the rest of us got the Eliminators, which were 125cc machines. In all, there were seven of us, because one of the women from the Thursday night class didn’t show. Anyways, we all got our helmets and gloves on, then got on our bikes. The instructor led us through a quick tour of the bikes, then we “power-walked” our bikes to the staging area, and the actual range.

Our first exercise was power-walking (actually, walking while mounted on the bike, but without actually starting up the engine) across the range, then turning the bike around, then coming back. It was during this first exercise that one of the students, and older lady who I suppose was in her mid-fifties, dropped her bike and had to be helped up. We finished the exercise, then took a break. The lady decided that she needed to take some private lessons before re-taking the MSF class, and called it quits for now. That kind of sucked, because she was so gung-ho before the class, and was the first one at the range that morning, waiting with helmet and gloves.

Anyways, the rest of the morning was spent riding around the range doing a number of drills and learning the basics. It was tons of fun, and really helped, especially learning how to counter-steer. That is incredible, and so easy after a little practice.

In the afternoon, we went to the classroom and finished up our book-studying. At the end, we took a written test, and I scored a perfect 100.

The next day, we met at the range once again at 6:45am. The woman who was a no-show the day before showed up and asked to reschedule. We were wondering what happened to her, but I guess something came up… The Sunday training class wasn’t quite as fun as the first day, because we focused on slow-speed maneouvers (not that the previous day was filled with high speed thrills) and also because it started raining. I had a rain jacket, so I was dry up top, but my pants got soaked.

The training went well, although I had a bit of trouble shifting from first to second. It always happened as I started the exercise and was heading towards the instructor. Later on, I just kept it in second the whole time, including accelerating from a stop. At about noon, we were finished with our training, and it was time for our riding tests. I think there were five skill evaluations, and for each mistake you make, you get one or more points. You are allowed up to 21 points to pass, and I ended up with 11 points. I thought I did better, but oh well… I know where my riding weaknesses are, which are slow right-hand turns, and emergency stopping. :O

In the end, all of us passed, with scores ranging from five up to 16. I got my certificate, a patch, and some coupons for riding gear at the local motorcycle shops. Next step is for me to take the written test at the Texas Dept. of Transportation to get my motorcycle endorsement. Then, I can decide if I want to insure and register my C70. I already have my eye on restoring a bigger bike, a Honda CB350 from the early 70’s. We’ll see…
Last night I went to the first class for the MSF Beginners Course. There were eight students, search including me, ailment
and the rider experience ranged from “used to ride a lot, side effects
but some years ago” to “I only sat on a bike once”. The youngest student was probably about 21, the oldest was nearing 60. Basically, the classroom session was going thru the course book, and answering the test questions, then talking about the answers in more detail. The instructor was very knowledgeable and funny, and had some nice insights. The things we covered from the book were really basic, though, like motorcycle controls, basic operation, and gear. I am really looking forward to the riding portions of the course, which start tomorrow and end on Sunday. It’s going to be fun!

Honda has this cool scooter prototype that runs on gasoline and electric power. Yes, shop
it’s a hybrid scooter! I am not too crazy about the looks, discount
but the concept is cool, and it should get incredible gas mileage. Maybe even better than the ~100mpg my C70 Passport gets!
I put the new tire on the front, capsule
filled it with air, cialis and it seems alright. I also checked the hi-beam light and it works nicely. I took it up to about 35mph tonight, help
I think it will go above 40mph, but I didn’t let it get up to speed. I guess the new tire was freaking me out a little. Next I gotta adjust the valve clearance, because it sounded like there was some tapping coming from there.

Last night I went over to the garage to work on the C70. Although I only have a small space to work in, pulmonologist
it is adequate. Earlier in the week, ambulance I went to Home Depot and bought the materials for my homemade jack-stand. It consisted of two bricks, a bag of dirt, and a tarp. The bricks go on the ground, for height, then part of the tarp, then the bag of dirt, then put the rest of the tarp over it. The tarp is there so that the bag doesn’t puncture. Then I lift the bike onto that pile, and the front wheel is off the ground. The dirt is pliable enough that the bike “settles” into it and is pretty stable. In the future, I’d like to get a center stand, which would make working on the C70 much easier, but the parts for it would cost upwards of $50, so I will just use my “Home Depot Special”.

Anyways, I got a bit of work done. First, I replaced the bulbs in the speedometer, the neutral indicator, and the hi-beam indicator. The panel lights up nicely now. I couldn’t test the hi-beam light yet because I didn’t start the engine, but the neutral light works perfectly. Also, I replaced the air filter, which was all dirty and oily. That was the easy part, and took about 10 minutes.

Next, I disconnected the front brake and speedometer cables, then removed the front wheel. I then removed the broken fender, and tried to line up the replacement I bought a week earlier. Unfortunately, the fender’s mounting holes are off by about 3/4”. It’s secured by four bolts, and the top two line up perfectly, but the bottom two by the wheel hub don’t quite match. I will need to make a bracket or extension of some sort. But for the time being, the top two bolts are holding the fender securely in place. Even if the fender shifts, there is no possibility of it getting stuck on the tire because of the way it is positioned.

Next, I removed the old, cracked tire from the front rim. That was easy. But fitting the new tire on the rim was a pain in the rear. It was not pliable at all, and all attempts to get the bead around the rim were defeated. I was super hot and sweaty too, so I decided to call it a night, and bring the tire back to the apartment and have another go at it the next day. But, after taking a shower, and reading up on the correct way to put the tire back on, I decided to try again. (In the comfort of and air-conditioned room!) The secret trick to putting on a tire of this kind is to put some soap around the rim. Simple as that. A little soap and some elbow grease, and the tire went on relatively easily. My fingers are sore, but the tire is ready to be filled with air. While I have the front wheel off, I am going to replace the brake shoes. But that will wait til tomorrow night.

I can’t wait to take it out for a spin, though! With the new tire in front, I want to take it up to top speed and see how fast it can go.

Things left to be done in the near-term:

Replace rear tire
Replace drive chain
Fix front brake light switch
Make brackets for fender
Change oil

Oh dang, I just remembered I forgot to charge the battery. Oh well, it looked like it still had plenty of juice, but I try to charge it every couple weeks.

While doing a Google search on “Honda C70” last night, clinic
I stumbled upon the Mad Bastard Scooter Rally ‘04, buy cialis
put together by CMG, a Canadian motorbike online magazine. I love to read stories like this. A group of several (6?) scooterists go on an endurance rally around Lake Ontario on scooters, including a Yellow 1981 Honda C70! I won’t give away the ending, whether they made it or not, but it’s a pretty cool story. You can also read about the ‘05 Rally here, although no C70’s made the trip in ‘05.

I have a fascination about motorbike journeys, and have been reading “Long Way Round” by Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman. Someday I’d like to take an extended trip on a bike too. Seems like a neat experience.
Supercub Ad

The fender that arrived for my C70 should fit on nicely. The mounting holes on the top are placed differently than on the original fender, try
but the forks actually have bolts in the correct place for the replacement fender as well, view so it should work out. The only problem is that I only have about an 8’x4’ space to work on it in the garage. The rest of the garage is filled with our moving stuff. I need to stop by Home Depot to buy some bags of dirt to make my homemade motorbike jack to lift the front of the bike up. Then I can change the front tire, adiposity
and replace the fender at the same time. Speaking of the fender, the color turns out to be a really nice dark greyish-blue. It is actually one of the colors I was thinking of painting the bike, so I guess it’s decided. I shouldn’t have any problem finding a matching color at the auto parts store. The photo above is what my bike will look like. I am even going to paint the side covers white to match the legshield. I just need to search for a luggage rack like the one in the photo, but it shouldn’t be too hard to find since they are still produced in Japan.

The other night I decided to take the C70 out for another spin. The cub turned over and started right up, but then it died after about half a minute. I couldn’t get it started again, so I wheeled it back towards the garage. Before I actually put it in, I decided to try one last time, and lo and behold, it started up. This time, the bike’s weight and/or metal mass was enough to trip the entrance gate, so I was cruising around the neighborhood in no time. It was about 85°F out, so the wind felt really good. It is so much fun to ride, even if it’s only at a rather tame 30mph. I think it could probably hit 40mph easy, but I will wait until I put on the new tires before I try. I also need to get a new chain, because the one that is on it now is stretched and rubbing against the chain guard. I also fixed the right rear signal: the bulb wasn’t contacting the wire properly. Anyways, the ride was tons of fun. I rode around the old neighborhood, since it is not busy at all and I can have the whole road to myself. I am getting used to riding it, and shifting is becoming second nature. My friend Chris told me a bit about the correct way to apply pressure to the brake on a motorcycle, so I kept that in mind when slowing down at the stop signs.

The list of things to do are:

Fix speedometer bulbs
Fix front brake lever switch
Replace chain
Adjust pistons
Replace tires
Replace fender
Replace petcock

I moved my bike from the balcony closet to the garage last night. I figured I would take a picture of it while it was in the livingroom. Before I took it to the garage, capsule
I went for a little spin around the neighborhood. I learned a couple things… first, anesthetist
the bike is not big enough to trip the parking gates. I had to wait for a car to come along and open them. Second, remedy
the light for the speedometer is out. It probably just needs a bulb.

When I came back to the parking lot, I met a fellow tenant who was getting off of his Yamaha YZF-R6. We chatted a bit about our bikes and he took a photo of my C70 with his camera phone. It turns out that he had never ridden a motorcycle before he bought his, just a few months ago. He said his friend had one, so he got one too. He didn’t take the MSF class, and failed his written test, so he has to go back tomorrow to retake it. Speaking of the MSF class, I am going to take it in a month or so. It should be really fun.

I found a blue fender for a C100 cub on Ebay today. It should fit my bike, view but may need some slight modifications, which might be as simple as drilling a couple holes in it. The C70 has I think five plastic body parts: the legshield, front fender, left side cover, right side cover, and lower handlebar cover. With the exception of the handlebar cover, all of those have some sort of damage to them on my bike. The side covers just have small hairline cracks, but I can live with those. The legshield is cracked in a few places, and I will eventually replace it, but am in no rush. The front fender had a crack in the very back, and it was ok, but then during the move, the fertilizer spreader in the garage fell back, and the handle whacked the fender right on top. It actually punched a hole through the top, and cracked it pretty good. I taped it up with packing tape, but it looks pretty bad. Hopefully the new fender will work out nicely.
I started it up today and ran it for about 20 minutes. In the storage closet off of the patio… I can’t wait to get out of our apartment and into our new house. I got new tires for the cub, sick
pilule but no tools or space to put them on. 🙁 Anyways, malady
I am keeping the cub’s battery charged, and it started up on the second try today. Lots of smoke came out of the exhaust at first. I hadn’t run it in over a month. It’s a great little bike with a super engine. I love it.
capsule
0,40,0″>

A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
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Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
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A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.

Yamaha has some neat little models of their motorcycles that you can build. Just print out the pdf’s, medicine cut the pieces out, mind
and you can assemble a cool little motorcycle. The YZF-R1 also has a cool toolkit, jack-stand, and other accessories.
That’s on my temporary driver’s license. It means I can legally operate a motorcycle! I was only planning to renew my regular license today, orthopedist
then study the little Motorcyclist’s Handbook before taking the test at a later day, opisthorchiasis
but after waiting an hour at the Texas Department of Public Safety (DMV to you non-Texans), treat I said to myself, “I’m not waiting here again” and I decided to just take the motorcycle test. I figured that the info from the MSF course was still fresh in my mind, so I had a good chance of passing. The test was done on a computer, with 20 total questions. You can skip questions, and they will be repeated later. You only actually need to answer 14 right, so I skipped a bunch, and answered the easy ones first. I then came back to the ones I skipped, answered three of them correctly, and the test ended, indicating that I answered 14 correctly (100% correct) and I passed. Woohoo!
On Saturday, psychotherapist
I woke up bright and early and met my fellow students at “the range” which was the Pflugerville High School parking lot. There, medicine we met the instructor, and those without their own helmets and/or gloves got fitted with ones the class provided. I had my HJC half-helmet and leather gloves, so I was all set. The bikes that they had for us were Kawasaki Eliminators and Honda Rebels. The two students who had the most experience got the two Rebels, which were 250’s, and the rest of us got the Eliminators, which were 125cc machines. In all, there were seven of us, because one of the women from the Thursday night class didn’t show. Anyways, we all got our helmets and gloves on, then got on our bikes. The instructor led us through a quick tour of the bikes, then we “power-walked” our bikes to the staging area, and the actual range.

Our first exercise was power-walking (actually, walking while mounted on the bike, but without actually starting up the engine) across the range, then turning the bike around, then coming back. It was during this first exercise that one of the students, and older lady who I suppose was in her mid-fifties, dropped her bike and had to be helped up. We finished the exercise, then took a break. The lady decided that she needed to take some private lessons before re-taking the MSF class, and called it quits for now. That kind of sucked, because she was so gung-ho before the class, and was the first one at the range that morning, waiting with helmet and gloves.

Anyways, the rest of the morning was spent riding around the range doing a number of drills and learning the basics. It was tons of fun, and really helped, especially learning how to counter-steer. That is incredible, and so easy after a little practice.

In the afternoon, we went to the classroom and finished up our book-studying. At the end, we took a written test, and I scored a perfect 100.

The next day, we met at the range once again at 6:45am. The woman who was a no-show the day before showed up and asked to reschedule. We were wondering what happened to her, but I guess something came up… The Sunday training class wasn’t quite as fun as the first day, because we focused on slow-speed maneouvers (not that the previous day was filled with high speed thrills) and also because it started raining. I had a rain jacket, so I was dry up top, but my pants got soaked.

The training went well, although I had a bit of trouble shifting from first to second. It always happened as I started the exercise and was heading towards the instructor. Later on, I just kept it in second the whole time, including accelerating from a stop. At about noon, we were finished with our training, and it was time for our riding tests. I think there were five skill evaluations, and for each mistake you make, you get one or more points. You are allowed up to 21 points to pass, and I ended up with 11 points. I thought I did better, but oh well… I know where my riding weaknesses are, which are slow right-hand turns, and emergency stopping. :O

In the end, all of us passed, with scores ranging from five up to 16. I got my certificate, a patch, and some coupons for riding gear at the local motorcycle shops. Next step is for me to take the written test at the Texas Dept. of Transportation to get my motorcycle endorsement. Then, I can decide if I want to insure and register my C70. I already have my eye on restoring a bigger bike, a Honda CB350 from the early 70’s. We’ll see…
Last night I went to the first class for the MSF Beginners Course. There were eight students, search including me, ailment
and the rider experience ranged from “used to ride a lot, side effects
but some years ago” to “I only sat on a bike once”. The youngest student was probably about 21, the oldest was nearing 60. Basically, the classroom session was going thru the course book, and answering the test questions, then talking about the answers in more detail. The instructor was very knowledgeable and funny, and had some nice insights. The things we covered from the book were really basic, though, like motorcycle controls, basic operation, and gear. I am really looking forward to the riding portions of the course, which start tomorrow and end on Sunday. It’s going to be fun!

Honda has this cool scooter prototype that runs on gasoline and electric power. Yes, shop
it’s a hybrid scooter! I am not too crazy about the looks, discount
but the concept is cool, and it should get incredible gas mileage. Maybe even better than the ~100mpg my C70 Passport gets!
I put the new tire on the front, capsule
filled it with air, cialis and it seems alright. I also checked the hi-beam light and it works nicely. I took it up to about 35mph tonight, help
I think it will go above 40mph, but I didn’t let it get up to speed. I guess the new tire was freaking me out a little. Next I gotta adjust the valve clearance, because it sounded like there was some tapping coming from there.

Last night I went over to the garage to work on the C70. Although I only have a small space to work in, pulmonologist
it is adequate. Earlier in the week, ambulance I went to Home Depot and bought the materials for my homemade jack-stand. It consisted of two bricks, a bag of dirt, and a tarp. The bricks go on the ground, for height, then part of the tarp, then the bag of dirt, then put the rest of the tarp over it. The tarp is there so that the bag doesn’t puncture. Then I lift the bike onto that pile, and the front wheel is off the ground. The dirt is pliable enough that the bike “settles” into it and is pretty stable. In the future, I’d like to get a center stand, which would make working on the C70 much easier, but the parts for it would cost upwards of $50, so I will just use my “Home Depot Special”.

Anyways, I got a bit of work done. First, I replaced the bulbs in the speedometer, the neutral indicator, and the hi-beam indicator. The panel lights up nicely now. I couldn’t test the hi-beam light yet because I didn’t start the engine, but the neutral light works perfectly. Also, I replaced the air filter, which was all dirty and oily. That was the easy part, and took about 10 minutes.

Next, I disconnected the front brake and speedometer cables, then removed the front wheel. I then removed the broken fender, and tried to line up the replacement I bought a week earlier. Unfortunately, the fender’s mounting holes are off by about 3/4”. It’s secured by four bolts, and the top two line up perfectly, but the bottom two by the wheel hub don’t quite match. I will need to make a bracket or extension of some sort. But for the time being, the top two bolts are holding the fender securely in place. Even if the fender shifts, there is no possibility of it getting stuck on the tire because of the way it is positioned.

Next, I removed the old, cracked tire from the front rim. That was easy. But fitting the new tire on the rim was a pain in the rear. It was not pliable at all, and all attempts to get the bead around the rim were defeated. I was super hot and sweaty too, so I decided to call it a night, and bring the tire back to the apartment and have another go at it the next day. But, after taking a shower, and reading up on the correct way to put the tire back on, I decided to try again. (In the comfort of and air-conditioned room!) The secret trick to putting on a tire of this kind is to put some soap around the rim. Simple as that. A little soap and some elbow grease, and the tire went on relatively easily. My fingers are sore, but the tire is ready to be filled with air. While I have the front wheel off, I am going to replace the brake shoes. But that will wait til tomorrow night.

I can’t wait to take it out for a spin, though! With the new tire in front, I want to take it up to top speed and see how fast it can go.

Things left to be done in the near-term:

Replace rear tire
Replace drive chain
Fix front brake light switch
Make brackets for fender
Change oil

Oh dang, I just remembered I forgot to charge the battery. Oh well, it looked like it still had plenty of juice, but I try to charge it every couple weeks.

While doing a Google search on “Honda C70” last night, clinic
I stumbled upon the Mad Bastard Scooter Rally ‘04, buy cialis
put together by CMG, a Canadian motorbike online magazine. I love to read stories like this. A group of several (6?) scooterists go on an endurance rally around Lake Ontario on scooters, including a Yellow 1981 Honda C70! I won’t give away the ending, whether they made it or not, but it’s a pretty cool story. You can also read about the ‘05 Rally here, although no C70’s made the trip in ‘05.

I have a fascination about motorbike journeys, and have been reading “Long Way Round” by Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman. Someday I’d like to take an extended trip on a bike too. Seems like a neat experience.
Supercub Ad

The fender that arrived for my C70 should fit on nicely. The mounting holes on the top are placed differently than on the original fender, try
but the forks actually have bolts in the correct place for the replacement fender as well, view so it should work out. The only problem is that I only have about an 8’x4’ space to work on it in the garage. The rest of the garage is filled with our moving stuff. I need to stop by Home Depot to buy some bags of dirt to make my homemade motorbike jack to lift the front of the bike up. Then I can change the front tire, adiposity
and replace the fender at the same time. Speaking of the fender, the color turns out to be a really nice dark greyish-blue. It is actually one of the colors I was thinking of painting the bike, so I guess it’s decided. I shouldn’t have any problem finding a matching color at the auto parts store. The photo above is what my bike will look like. I am even going to paint the side covers white to match the legshield. I just need to search for a luggage rack like the one in the photo, but it shouldn’t be too hard to find since they are still produced in Japan.

The other night I decided to take the C70 out for another spin. The cub turned over and started right up, but then it died after about half a minute. I couldn’t get it started again, so I wheeled it back towards the garage. Before I actually put it in, I decided to try one last time, and lo and behold, it started up. This time, the bike’s weight and/or metal mass was enough to trip the entrance gate, so I was cruising around the neighborhood in no time. It was about 85°F out, so the wind felt really good. It is so much fun to ride, even if it’s only at a rather tame 30mph. I think it could probably hit 40mph easy, but I will wait until I put on the new tires before I try. I also need to get a new chain, because the one that is on it now is stretched and rubbing against the chain guard. I also fixed the right rear signal: the bulb wasn’t contacting the wire properly. Anyways, the ride was tons of fun. I rode around the old neighborhood, since it is not busy at all and I can have the whole road to myself. I am getting used to riding it, and shifting is becoming second nature. My friend Chris told me a bit about the correct way to apply pressure to the brake on a motorcycle, so I kept that in mind when slowing down at the stop signs.

The list of things to do are:

Fix speedometer bulbs
Fix front brake lever switch
Replace chain
Adjust pistons
Replace tires
Replace fender
Replace petcock

I moved my bike from the balcony closet to the garage last night. I figured I would take a picture of it while it was in the livingroom. Before I took it to the garage, capsule
I went for a little spin around the neighborhood. I learned a couple things… first, anesthetist
the bike is not big enough to trip the parking gates. I had to wait for a car to come along and open them. Second, remedy
the light for the speedometer is out. It probably just needs a bulb.

When I came back to the parking lot, I met a fellow tenant who was getting off of his Yamaha YZF-R6. We chatted a bit about our bikes and he took a photo of my C70 with his camera phone. It turns out that he had never ridden a motorcycle before he bought his, just a few months ago. He said his friend had one, so he got one too. He didn’t take the MSF class, and failed his written test, so he has to go back tomorrow to retake it. Speaking of the MSF class, I am going to take it in a month or so. It should be really fun.

I found a blue fender for a C100 cub on Ebay today. It should fit my bike, view but may need some slight modifications, which might be as simple as drilling a couple holes in it. The C70 has I think five plastic body parts: the legshield, front fender, left side cover, right side cover, and lower handlebar cover. With the exception of the handlebar cover, all of those have some sort of damage to them on my bike. The side covers just have small hairline cracks, but I can live with those. The legshield is cracked in a few places, and I will eventually replace it, but am in no rush. The front fender had a crack in the very back, and it was ok, but then during the move, the fertilizer spreader in the garage fell back, and the handle whacked the fender right on top. It actually punched a hole through the top, and cracked it pretty good. I taped it up with packing tape, but it looks pretty bad. Hopefully the new fender will work out nicely.
I started it up today and ran it for about 20 minutes. In the storage closet off of the patio… I can’t wait to get out of our apartment and into our new house. I got new tires for the cub, sick
pilule but no tools or space to put them on. 🙁 Anyways, malady
I am keeping the cub’s battery charged, and it started up on the second try today. Lots of smoke came out of the exhaust at first. I hadn’t run it in over a month. It’s a great little bike with a super engine. I love it.
After waiting for three months, sovaldi the Michelin Gazelle tires I ordered for my C70 arrived at the shop. Apparently a big batch comes over from Asia to the distribution channels here in the states only a few times a year. But, illness
the bike is in storage while we wait for our new house to be built. I will have to put on the new tires later in the year. 🙁 Which reminds me, I gotta charge the battery…
capsule
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A funny Supercub CM!
medical
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This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
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Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
there 0, more about
40,0″>

A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.

Yamaha has some neat little models of their motorcycles that you can build. Just print out the pdf’s, medicine cut the pieces out, mind
and you can assemble a cool little motorcycle. The YZF-R1 also has a cool toolkit, jack-stand, and other accessories.
That’s on my temporary driver’s license. It means I can legally operate a motorcycle! I was only planning to renew my regular license today, orthopedist
then study the little Motorcyclist’s Handbook before taking the test at a later day, opisthorchiasis
but after waiting an hour at the Texas Department of Public Safety (DMV to you non-Texans), treat I said to myself, “I’m not waiting here again” and I decided to just take the motorcycle test. I figured that the info from the MSF course was still fresh in my mind, so I had a good chance of passing. The test was done on a computer, with 20 total questions. You can skip questions, and they will be repeated later. You only actually need to answer 14 right, so I skipped a bunch, and answered the easy ones first. I then came back to the ones I skipped, answered three of them correctly, and the test ended, indicating that I answered 14 correctly (100% correct) and I passed. Woohoo!
On Saturday, psychotherapist
I woke up bright and early and met my fellow students at “the range” which was the Pflugerville High School parking lot. There, medicine we met the instructor, and those without their own helmets and/or gloves got fitted with ones the class provided. I had my HJC half-helmet and leather gloves, so I was all set. The bikes that they had for us were Kawasaki Eliminators and Honda Rebels. The two students who had the most experience got the two Rebels, which were 250’s, and the rest of us got the Eliminators, which were 125cc machines. In all, there were seven of us, because one of the women from the Thursday night class didn’t show. Anyways, we all got our helmets and gloves on, then got on our bikes. The instructor led us through a quick tour of the bikes, then we “power-walked” our bikes to the staging area, and the actual range.

Our first exercise was power-walking (actually, walking while mounted on the bike, but without actually starting up the engine) across the range, then turning the bike around, then coming back. It was during this first exercise that one of the students, and older lady who I suppose was in her mid-fifties, dropped her bike and had to be helped up. We finished the exercise, then took a break. The lady decided that she needed to take some private lessons before re-taking the MSF class, and called it quits for now. That kind of sucked, because she was so gung-ho before the class, and was the first one at the range that morning, waiting with helmet and gloves.

Anyways, the rest of the morning was spent riding around the range doing a number of drills and learning the basics. It was tons of fun, and really helped, especially learning how to counter-steer. That is incredible, and so easy after a little practice.

In the afternoon, we went to the classroom and finished up our book-studying. At the end, we took a written test, and I scored a perfect 100.

The next day, we met at the range once again at 6:45am. The woman who was a no-show the day before showed up and asked to reschedule. We were wondering what happened to her, but I guess something came up… The Sunday training class wasn’t quite as fun as the first day, because we focused on slow-speed maneouvers (not that the previous day was filled with high speed thrills) and also because it started raining. I had a rain jacket, so I was dry up top, but my pants got soaked.

The training went well, although I had a bit of trouble shifting from first to second. It always happened as I started the exercise and was heading towards the instructor. Later on, I just kept it in second the whole time, including accelerating from a stop. At about noon, we were finished with our training, and it was time for our riding tests. I think there were five skill evaluations, and for each mistake you make, you get one or more points. You are allowed up to 21 points to pass, and I ended up with 11 points. I thought I did better, but oh well… I know where my riding weaknesses are, which are slow right-hand turns, and emergency stopping. :O

In the end, all of us passed, with scores ranging from five up to 16. I got my certificate, a patch, and some coupons for riding gear at the local motorcycle shops. Next step is for me to take the written test at the Texas Dept. of Transportation to get my motorcycle endorsement. Then, I can decide if I want to insure and register my C70. I already have my eye on restoring a bigger bike, a Honda CB350 from the early 70’s. We’ll see…
Last night I went to the first class for the MSF Beginners Course. There were eight students, search including me, ailment
and the rider experience ranged from “used to ride a lot, side effects
but some years ago” to “I only sat on a bike once”. The youngest student was probably about 21, the oldest was nearing 60. Basically, the classroom session was going thru the course book, and answering the test questions, then talking about the answers in more detail. The instructor was very knowledgeable and funny, and had some nice insights. The things we covered from the book were really basic, though, like motorcycle controls, basic operation, and gear. I am really looking forward to the riding portions of the course, which start tomorrow and end on Sunday. It’s going to be fun!

Honda has this cool scooter prototype that runs on gasoline and electric power. Yes, shop
it’s a hybrid scooter! I am not too crazy about the looks, discount
but the concept is cool, and it should get incredible gas mileage. Maybe even better than the ~100mpg my C70 Passport gets!
I put the new tire on the front, capsule
filled it with air, cialis and it seems alright. I also checked the hi-beam light and it works nicely. I took it up to about 35mph tonight, help
I think it will go above 40mph, but I didn’t let it get up to speed. I guess the new tire was freaking me out a little. Next I gotta adjust the valve clearance, because it sounded like there was some tapping coming from there.

Last night I went over to the garage to work on the C70. Although I only have a small space to work in, pulmonologist
it is adequate. Earlier in the week, ambulance I went to Home Depot and bought the materials for my homemade jack-stand. It consisted of two bricks, a bag of dirt, and a tarp. The bricks go on the ground, for height, then part of the tarp, then the bag of dirt, then put the rest of the tarp over it. The tarp is there so that the bag doesn’t puncture. Then I lift the bike onto that pile, and the front wheel is off the ground. The dirt is pliable enough that the bike “settles” into it and is pretty stable. In the future, I’d like to get a center stand, which would make working on the C70 much easier, but the parts for it would cost upwards of $50, so I will just use my “Home Depot Special”.

Anyways, I got a bit of work done. First, I replaced the bulbs in the speedometer, the neutral indicator, and the hi-beam indicator. The panel lights up nicely now. I couldn’t test the hi-beam light yet because I didn’t start the engine, but the neutral light works perfectly. Also, I replaced the air filter, which was all dirty and oily. That was the easy part, and took about 10 minutes.

Next, I disconnected the front brake and speedometer cables, then removed the front wheel. I then removed the broken fender, and tried to line up the replacement I bought a week earlier. Unfortunately, the fender’s mounting holes are off by about 3/4”. It’s secured by four bolts, and the top two line up perfectly, but the bottom two by the wheel hub don’t quite match. I will need to make a bracket or extension of some sort. But for the time being, the top two bolts are holding the fender securely in place. Even if the fender shifts, there is no possibility of it getting stuck on the tire because of the way it is positioned.

Next, I removed the old, cracked tire from the front rim. That was easy. But fitting the new tire on the rim was a pain in the rear. It was not pliable at all, and all attempts to get the bead around the rim were defeated. I was super hot and sweaty too, so I decided to call it a night, and bring the tire back to the apartment and have another go at it the next day. But, after taking a shower, and reading up on the correct way to put the tire back on, I decided to try again. (In the comfort of and air-conditioned room!) The secret trick to putting on a tire of this kind is to put some soap around the rim. Simple as that. A little soap and some elbow grease, and the tire went on relatively easily. My fingers are sore, but the tire is ready to be filled with air. While I have the front wheel off, I am going to replace the brake shoes. But that will wait til tomorrow night.

I can’t wait to take it out for a spin, though! With the new tire in front, I want to take it up to top speed and see how fast it can go.

Things left to be done in the near-term:

Replace rear tire
Replace drive chain
Fix front brake light switch
Make brackets for fender
Change oil

Oh dang, I just remembered I forgot to charge the battery. Oh well, it looked like it still had plenty of juice, but I try to charge it every couple weeks.

While doing a Google search on “Honda C70” last night, clinic
I stumbled upon the Mad Bastard Scooter Rally ‘04, buy cialis
put together by CMG, a Canadian motorbike online magazine. I love to read stories like this. A group of several (6?) scooterists go on an endurance rally around Lake Ontario on scooters, including a Yellow 1981 Honda C70! I won’t give away the ending, whether they made it or not, but it’s a pretty cool story. You can also read about the ‘05 Rally here, although no C70’s made the trip in ‘05.

I have a fascination about motorbike journeys, and have been reading “Long Way Round” by Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman. Someday I’d like to take an extended trip on a bike too. Seems like a neat experience.
Supercub Ad

The fender that arrived for my C70 should fit on nicely. The mounting holes on the top are placed differently than on the original fender, try
but the forks actually have bolts in the correct place for the replacement fender as well, view so it should work out. The only problem is that I only have about an 8’x4’ space to work on it in the garage. The rest of the garage is filled with our moving stuff. I need to stop by Home Depot to buy some bags of dirt to make my homemade motorbike jack to lift the front of the bike up. Then I can change the front tire, adiposity
and replace the fender at the same time. Speaking of the fender, the color turns out to be a really nice dark greyish-blue. It is actually one of the colors I was thinking of painting the bike, so I guess it’s decided. I shouldn’t have any problem finding a matching color at the auto parts store. The photo above is what my bike will look like. I am even going to paint the side covers white to match the legshield. I just need to search for a luggage rack like the one in the photo, but it shouldn’t be too hard to find since they are still produced in Japan.

The other night I decided to take the C70 out for another spin. The cub turned over and started right up, but then it died after about half a minute. I couldn’t get it started again, so I wheeled it back towards the garage. Before I actually put it in, I decided to try one last time, and lo and behold, it started up. This time, the bike’s weight and/or metal mass was enough to trip the entrance gate, so I was cruising around the neighborhood in no time. It was about 85°F out, so the wind felt really good. It is so much fun to ride, even if it’s only at a rather tame 30mph. I think it could probably hit 40mph easy, but I will wait until I put on the new tires before I try. I also need to get a new chain, because the one that is on it now is stretched and rubbing against the chain guard. I also fixed the right rear signal: the bulb wasn’t contacting the wire properly. Anyways, the ride was tons of fun. I rode around the old neighborhood, since it is not busy at all and I can have the whole road to myself. I am getting used to riding it, and shifting is becoming second nature. My friend Chris told me a bit about the correct way to apply pressure to the brake on a motorcycle, so I kept that in mind when slowing down at the stop signs.

The list of things to do are:

Fix speedometer bulbs
Fix front brake lever switch
Replace chain
Adjust pistons
Replace tires
Replace fender
Replace petcock

I moved my bike from the balcony closet to the garage last night. I figured I would take a picture of it while it was in the livingroom. Before I took it to the garage, capsule
I went for a little spin around the neighborhood. I learned a couple things… first, anesthetist
the bike is not big enough to trip the parking gates. I had to wait for a car to come along and open them. Second, remedy
the light for the speedometer is out. It probably just needs a bulb.

When I came back to the parking lot, I met a fellow tenant who was getting off of his Yamaha YZF-R6. We chatted a bit about our bikes and he took a photo of my C70 with his camera phone. It turns out that he had never ridden a motorcycle before he bought his, just a few months ago. He said his friend had one, so he got one too. He didn’t take the MSF class, and failed his written test, so he has to go back tomorrow to retake it. Speaking of the MSF class, I am going to take it in a month or so. It should be really fun.

I found a blue fender for a C100 cub on Ebay today. It should fit my bike, view but may need some slight modifications, which might be as simple as drilling a couple holes in it. The C70 has I think five plastic body parts: the legshield, front fender, left side cover, right side cover, and lower handlebar cover. With the exception of the handlebar cover, all of those have some sort of damage to them on my bike. The side covers just have small hairline cracks, but I can live with those. The legshield is cracked in a few places, and I will eventually replace it, but am in no rush. The front fender had a crack in the very back, and it was ok, but then during the move, the fertilizer spreader in the garage fell back, and the handle whacked the fender right on top. It actually punched a hole through the top, and cracked it pretty good. I taped it up with packing tape, but it looks pretty bad. Hopefully the new fender will work out nicely.
I started it up today and ran it for about 20 minutes. In the storage closet off of the patio… I can’t wait to get out of our apartment and into our new house. I got new tires for the cub, sick
pilule but no tools or space to put them on. 🙁 Anyways, malady
I am keeping the cub’s battery charged, and it started up on the second try today. Lots of smoke came out of the exhaust at first. I hadn’t run it in over a month. It’s a great little bike with a super engine. I love it.
After waiting for three months, sovaldi the Michelin Gazelle tires I ordered for my C70 arrived at the shop. Apparently a big batch comes over from Asia to the distribution channels here in the states only a few times a year. But, illness
the bike is in storage while we wait for our new house to be built. I will have to put on the new tires later in the year. 🙁 Which reminds me, I gotta charge the battery…

I used to have this on my old website, unhealthy
and just recently found it again. It’s a quick Honda commercial featuring the Supercub. Speaking of the little Honda motorbike, case I was riding around the neighborhood at lunch, and it was totally fun. But the carb needs adjustment because the engine is not getting enough fuel at high rpm’s. I am waiting for a kit that will replace all the parts in the carb that I suspect are a little clogged. I also got a new battery and it is charged up. Next I will put in the headlight, since putting in a headlight without a charged battery will blow the bulb…
capsule
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A funny Supercub CM!
medical
0,40,0″>

This looks like a good motorcycle adventure story. More info here.
Went for a night ride on the supercub. As always, troche a lot of fun. My new jacket is great. It really blocks the wind making for a super comfortable ride. When it gets warmer, the vents will be welcome. Getting close to the 6,000 mark on the bike!
Just so my loyal readers (all three of you), dosage
I will be adding old motorbike-related posts from Takoyaki.org here. Anything before 2010 is originally from that blog.
Mariko goes into the garage this morning and then comes to get me. “It smells like gas in the garage!”. So I rush in there, here knowing that it must be from the supercub since I just filled it up yesterday. I said, arthritis
“Oh, my supercub must be leaking.” And she says, “Oh good, I thought it was one of our cars.” To which I replied, “What?! The supercub is my baby!” Anyways, I guess it is time to order a new fuel petcock as the old one wasn’t completely sealing off the fuel flow. And I need to take apart the carb and make sure the fuel cutoff inside the bowl is working correctly. Either one of those would have prevented the leak.

I really like the look of this helmet. Right now I have a full-face HJC similar to this, pharm
but like the open-face look better. I know it’s safer to have the DOT/Snell approved helmet I use now, but still…!

allergist
on Flickr” href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/barron/2576306092/”>C70 Rear Wiring Plan

I finally finished covering my Honda C70 with red paint! I didn’t do the entire bike (underneath the legshield and a couple other hidden places), but unless you look really closely, you wouldn’t know that it was originally blue. Next, I need to route the wiring to the rear turn signals more cleanly. This means drilling a hole in the fender to drop the wires down. I bought a little black rubber grommet to make the hold look a little nicer, and I don’t foresee any trouble. While I have the rear wheel off, I think I am going to replace the tire/tube. The front one was a pain to replace. It just took a lot of elbow grease to do it, but I’m still not looking forward to it. After that, the things I want to do are to straighten out the footpegs, then shave to seat foam down a little. Also I bought a little switch cover for the hi-beam switch, since it had broken off.

Just this week I also got my new license plate and registration sticker. The title should be in my hands in a couple weeks as well. Then the only thing from keeping the bike from being fully legal is the inspection. Hopefully she passes without any problems.
adiposity
0, shop
40,0″>

Yay for the Honda Supercub! Still going strong at 60.
I finally got around to seriously getting the title for my Honda C70 squared away. I have the title, page
but it is not signed by me yet. It has the previous owner, try
and his signature that he has sold it. The next step was to contact him and have him sign a “Transfer of Title” form. But, when I tried to get in contact with him a few years ago, I could only get as far as his personal assistant. The previous owner is the retired CEO of a huge auto conglomerate, so I figured he wouldn’t even really care about an old motorbike from 17 years ago. Anyways, the city that I live in now has a nice title transfer policy. Basically I send the form to the last known address in a registered letter with return receipt. Upon them receiving the letter, they have 10 days to respond to me. If I do not receive a response, I can take my return receipt form to the Titling Department, and they will transfer it to me. Or, if the letter comes back to me unopened, they will accept that as sufficient for title transfer.

Today I checked the status of the letter, and saw this:

Label/Receipt Number: 7008 1140 0002 1234 5678

Status: Moved, Left no Address

Your item was returned to the sender on June 3, 2008 because the addressee moved and left no forwarding address.

Woohoo! Looks like I should be receiving my letter back to me, and can take that to the Titling Office and have it transferred over! I can’t wait. Next will be insurance, and then getting the bike inspected. After that, it will be fully legal to ride!
The Honda Supercub has surpassed the 60-million mark of total units produced! It’s the 50th anniversary of the legendary bike. It’s the highest selling vehicle of all time, sickness
and it gets ~100 mpg.

Article at Yahoo! Japan

Translated (to English) article
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A fun little anime clip I found from The Scooter Scoop:
On my morning commute, prostate I sometimes see a dude on a Harley riding to work. His attire; old-school leather slippers (the kind Mike Brady wore with his pajamas and robe), approved
shorts, stuff
t-shirt, “can” headphones with a basketball sweatband to keep them on his head. Those headphones plus the fact that he is bald makes him look like Lando’s second-in-command from SW:ESB. Except on a Harley. Wearing den clothes.
Last night I spent an hour in our apartment garage getting the C70 ready for the move. I emptied out all the gasoline using the carb overflow tube. It took a long time to drain 3/4 gallon thru that skinny little tube, try
but it was a clean operation. In the past, I used to disconnect the fuel line from the petcock and drain it into the gas can, which can be messy and smelly, but quick. The method I used last night involved removing the gas cap, loosening the drain plug, turning the fuel petcock to reserve, and letting the fuel flow into the carb bowl and out its overflow tube.

It dripped for about half an hour, while I packed up all the tools and spare parts and removed the fragile legshield. I told the moving company that we are moving “a little moped, which is not working and is dry”, and they said that’s ok. The C70 is a bit bigger than a moped, but it is such a funky looking bike that people in the U.S. don’t necessarily think of it as a motorcycle or scooter, especially with the legshield off. They don’t really know what to think. Anyways, I hope that the moving goes smoothly!

I was looking at the US Vespa site, viagra and noticed this image on the opening page. I thought, cheapest
“That looks very familiar.” Then I remembered seeing an old 1960 Supercub ad, which used a similar concept. Kinda neat…


I painted the replacement front fender I bought a year ago. It was originally red, otolaryngologist
and I plan to paint it dark blue, look along witht the bike frame, tooth
but temporarily painted it an off-white color, the same as the side covers. I didn’t want to have a red fender on my light blue bike. I used Rustoleum “Paint for Plastic”, and it turned out pretty good. I will put on a coat or two of clear coat in a couple days after it dries a bit.


While in Japan (and before we met), Sildenafil
Mariko used to have a scooter like the one above. She cannot remember what happened to it, though. I can’t believe you can just not know what happened to you scooter? Crazy woman!
Tonight I went for a ride around the neighborhood. It was about 77° out when I started, human enhancement
which made for a perfect ride. First I went to the parking lot of the huge church “compound” near our place to practice some hard braking and slow tight turns. I saw the Austin Police Dept motorcycle cops doing their training there a couple weeks ago, here and the parking lot was marked with painted pylons, and which I used to do some u-turns. After doing that for a minute or so, I took off and rode around the neighborhood. Tonight was the first time I wore my full-face helmet, and it makes such a huge difference! I felt much more protected, and the wind was kept off my face and eyes, but visibility was still excellent. It didn’t even feel like I was wearing a helmet after a while. It is so much better riding with a full-face helmet as opposed to a half/open face helmet, even at 40mph and lower.

We went to a wine-tasting at Central Market, healing
cheap and I spotted this nice C70 Passport.

I have been reading “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon for a week or so, sanitary
and it is really good. It’s about a round-the-world trip that Ted Simon took upon his Triumph motorcycle back in the 70’s. He balances the technical motorcycle aspect with the travel aspect perfectly (to me, at least), and the pacing is nice and fast. I read that Simon is attempting the same trip by motorcycle again, and I can’t wait to read about the modern-day journey. It will be interesting to get his perspective on how the world has changed.

Got a new helmet yesterday. It’s an HJC CL-14, Hemophilia
and pretty nice, Migraine
with both DOT and SNELL approval. It’s got five adjustable vents, and fits snugly, but the padding is such that my glasses go on easily. I have my old helmet up for sale, but no takers yet.
Went riding last night, this site
and it was fun as always. I am getting a lot more comfortable shifting. It’s almost automatic, dentist
I don’t even have to think too much about it. Downshifting and slowing down before I initiate a turn are pretty automatic now as well. I am getting confident that the bike is mechanically sound, price
and reliable, so I can just enjoy riding and exploring around my small neighborhood.

The mileage on my C70 is at 5,737.9, so I have put a whopping 47.4 miles on it! I can’t believe I put on that kind of mileage just putting around the neighborhood. Top speed is about 45mph, and that is going on flat ground, with plenty of straigtaway to get going. If you want to read more detail about the work that I have been doing on the bike, you can go to the page I made for the restoration project here.
I was going to change the rear tire on the C70 last night, gonorrhea
when I noticed that it was in pretty good shape. The front was all cracked and worn, emergency
so I had replaced it, search
and had thought the rear would be the same. But, there is no cracking, and plenty of tread left. But, I noticed that it is the wrong size. When the previous owner changed the tire, he used the same size as the front, which is 2.25/70. The correct size is 2.50/70. Although it will run fine with this smaller tire, the top speed will be reduced slightly, while rate of acceleration is increased. I decided to just keep the smaller tire on the back for now, and when I have more room in the new house/garage I will replace it.
OK, approved
this is my dream bike. A Honda CB400SS… available in Japan, but not in the U.S. Bummer… It’s got the classic style, but with updated components. If only they sold this in the States, it would be so cool. I love the white tank with rust-colored graphics. The blue and silver color scheme is nice too.

Check out the cool wallpapers they have at the Japanese Honda site.

So, tooth
I have been having tons of fun restoring my C70 these days, and still love it, but I have my eyes on a new (old) bike… a Honda CB350. These were apparently very popular in the early 70’s, and tons of them were sold here in the States. I see ads for them every so often, prices ranging from “free” to $1,500 for a close-to-perfect specimen. I am interested in a “runs, but needs some work” condition model. The motorcycle itself is not really a sought-after classic, but I like the look of it, and it’s small, light. Plus, parts are readily available on ebay, with more availability and cheaper than C70 parts.

One of the things about the C70 is that, although it goes up to 40mph, it takes it’s own sweet time to get up to speed. I guess that’s the trade-off, however, for being so economical (over 100mpg). But being rather slow makes it more dangerous, even for neighborhood riding. The bigger bike is safer, since it can pull away from tailgating cars more easily. With the C70, once you hit 40, that’s pretty much it. The CB350, from what I have read. has enough power and zip to accelerate faster than most traffic. (How’s that for rationalizing)

My thinking at this point is that I need to get fix the C70 to as good a condition as I can, then sell it to fund my CB350 project. It’s funny, but a nice C70 sells for pretty good money. I think I would be able to get $1,000 for it. By my estimate, I have put a grand total of $500 into it, including buying the bike itself.

At any rate, to do more restoration on the C70, I need to wait until we are in the new house, so I can unpack all my tools and C70 parts. Plus, we will have a 2 1/2-car garage, which means more room!!! So, this project will have to wait until 2006. In the meantime, I still have some things I can do to the C70, like work on some electrical issues.

Yamaha has some neat little models of their motorcycles that you can build. Just print out the pdf’s, medicine cut the pieces out, mind
and you can assemble a cool little motorcycle. The YZF-R1 also has a cool toolkit, jack-stand, and other accessories.
That’s on my temporary driver’s license. It means I can legally operate a motorcycle! I was only planning to renew my regular license today, orthopedist
then study the little Motorcyclist’s Handbook before taking the test at a later day, opisthorchiasis
but after waiting an hour at the Texas Department of Public Safety (DMV to you non-Texans), treat I said to myself, “I’m not waiting here again” and I decided to just take the motorcycle test. I figured that the info from the MSF course was still fresh in my mind, so I had a good chance of passing. The test was done on a computer, with 20 total questions. You can skip questions, and they will be repeated later. You only actually need to answer 14 right, so I skipped a bunch, and answered the easy ones first. I then came back to the ones I skipped, answered three of them correctly, and the test ended, indicating that I answered 14 correctly (100% correct) and I passed. Woohoo!
On Saturday, psychotherapist
I woke up bright and early and met my fellow students at “the range” which was the Pflugerville High School parking lot. There, medicine we met the instructor, and those without their own helmets and/or gloves got fitted with ones the class provided. I had my HJC half-helmet and leather gloves, so I was all set. The bikes that they had for us were Kawasaki Eliminators and Honda Rebels. The two students who had the most experience got the two Rebels, which were 250’s, and the rest of us got the Eliminators, which were 125cc machines. In all, there were seven of us, because one of the women from the Thursday night class didn’t show. Anyways, we all got our helmets and gloves on, then got on our bikes. The instructor led us through a quick tour of the bikes, then we “power-walked” our bikes to the staging area, and the actual range.

Our first exercise was power-walking (actually, walking while mounted on the bike, but without actually starting up the engine) across the range, then turning the bike around, then coming back. It was during this first exercise that one of the students, and older lady who I suppose was in her mid-fifties, dropped her bike and had to be helped up. We finished the exercise, then took a break. The lady decided that she needed to take some private lessons before re-taking the MSF class, and called it quits for now. That kind of sucked, because she was so gung-ho before the class, and was the first one at the range that morning, waiting with helmet and gloves.

Anyways, the rest of the morning was spent riding around the range doing a number of drills and learning the basics. It was tons of fun, and really helped, especially learning how to counter-steer. That is incredible, and so easy after a little practice.

In the afternoon, we went to the classroom and finished up our book-studying. At the end, we took a written test, and I scored a perfect 100.

The next day, we met at the range once again at 6:45am. The woman who was a no-show the day before showed up and asked to reschedule. We were wondering what happened to her, but I guess something came up… The Sunday training class wasn’t quite as fun as the first day, because we focused on slow-speed maneouvers (not that the previous day was filled with high speed thrills) and also because it started raining. I had a rain jacket, so I was dry up top, but my pants got soaked.

The training went well, although I had a bit of trouble shifting from first to second. It always happened as I started the exercise and was heading towards the instructor. Later on, I just kept it in second the whole time, including accelerating from a stop. At about noon, we were finished with our training, and it was time for our riding tests. I think there were five skill evaluations, and for each mistake you make, you get one or more points. You are allowed up to 21 points to pass, and I ended up with 11 points. I thought I did better, but oh well… I know where my riding weaknesses are, which are slow right-hand turns, and emergency stopping. :O

In the end, all of us passed, with scores ranging from five up to 16. I got my certificate, a patch, and some coupons for riding gear at the local motorcycle shops. Next step is for me to take the written test at the Texas Dept. of Transportation to get my motorcycle endorsement. Then, I can decide if I want to insure and register my C70. I already have my eye on restoring a bigger bike, a Honda CB350 from the early 70’s. We’ll see…
Last night I went to the first class for the MSF Beginners Course. There were eight students, search including me, ailment
and the rider experience ranged from “used to ride a lot, side effects
but some years ago” to “I only sat on a bike once”. The youngest student was probably about 21, the oldest was nearing 60. Basically, the classroom session was going thru the course book, and answering the test questions, then talking about the answers in more detail. The instructor was very knowledgeable and funny, and had some nice insights. The things we covered from the book were really basic, though, like motorcycle controls, basic operation, and gear. I am really looking forward to the riding portions of the course, which start tomorrow and end on Sunday. It’s going to be fun!

Honda has this cool scooter prototype that runs on gasoline and electric power. Yes, shop
it’s a hybrid scooter! I am not too crazy about the looks, discount
but the concept is cool, and it should get incredible gas mileage. Maybe even better than the ~100mpg my C70 Passport gets!
I put the new tire on the front, capsule
filled it with air, cialis and it seems alright. I also checked the hi-beam light and it works nicely. I took it up to about 35mph tonight, help
I think it will go above 40mph, but I didn’t let it get up to speed. I guess the new tire was freaking me out a little. Next I gotta adjust the valve clearance, because it sounded like there was some tapping coming from there.

Last night I went over to the garage to work on the C70. Although I only have a small space to work in, pulmonologist
it is adequate. Earlier in the week, ambulance I went to Home Depot and bought the materials for my homemade jack-stand. It consisted of two bricks, a bag of dirt, and a tarp. The bricks go on the ground, for height, then part of the tarp, then the bag of dirt, then put the rest of the tarp over it. The tarp is there so that the bag doesn’t puncture. Then I lift the bike onto that pile, and the front wheel is off the ground. The dirt is pliable enough that the bike “settles” into it and is pretty stable. In the future, I’d like to get a center stand, which would make working on the C70 much easier, but the parts for it would cost upwards of $50, so I will just use my “Home Depot Special”.

Anyways, I got a bit of work done. First, I replaced the bulbs in the speedometer, the neutral indicator, and the hi-beam indicator. The panel lights up nicely now. I couldn’t test the hi-beam light yet because I didn’t start the engine, but the neutral light works perfectly. Also, I replaced the air filter, which was all dirty and oily. That was the easy part, and took about 10 minutes.

Next, I disconnected the front brake and speedometer cables, then removed the front wheel. I then removed the broken fender, and tried to line up the replacement I bought a week earlier. Unfortunately, the fender’s mounting holes are off by about 3/4”. It’s secured by four bolts, and the top two line up perfectly, but the bottom two by the wheel hub don’t quite match. I will need to make a bracket or extension of some sort. But for the time being, the top two bolts are holding the fender securely in place. Even if the fender shifts, there is no possibility of it getting stuck on the tire because of the way it is positioned.

Next, I removed the old, cracked tire from the front rim. That was easy. But fitting the new tire on the rim was a pain in the rear. It was not pliable at all, and all attempts to get the bead around the rim were defeated. I was super hot and sweaty too, so I decided to call it a night, and bring the tire back to the apartment and have another go at it the next day. But, after taking a shower, and reading up on the correct way to put the tire back on, I decided to try again. (In the comfort of and air-conditioned room!) The secret trick to putting on a tire of this kind is to put some soap around the rim. Simple as that. A little soap and some elbow grease, and the tire went on relatively easily. My fingers are sore, but the tire is ready to be filled with air. While I have the front wheel off, I am going to replace the brake shoes. But that will wait til tomorrow night.

I can’t wait to take it out for a spin, though! With the new tire in front, I want to take it up to top speed and see how fast it can go.

Things left to be done in the near-term:

Replace rear tire
Replace drive chain
Fix front brake light switch
Make brackets for fender
Change oil

Oh dang, I just remembered I forgot to charge the battery. Oh well, it looked like it still had plenty of juice, but I try to charge it every couple weeks.

While doing a Google search on “Honda C70” last night, clinic
I stumbled upon the Mad Bastard Scooter Rally ‘04, buy cialis
put together by CMG, a Canadian motorbike online magazine. I love to read stories like this. A group of several (6?) scooterists go on an endurance rally around Lake Ontario on scooters, including a Yellow 1981 Honda C70! I won’t give away the ending, whether they made it or not, but it’s a pretty cool story. You can also read about the ‘05 Rally here, although no C70’s made the trip in ‘05.

I have a fascination about motorbike journeys, and have been reading “Long Way Round” by Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman. Someday I’d like to take an extended trip on a bike too. Seems like a neat experience.
Supercub Ad

The fender that arrived for my C70 should fit on nicely. The mounting holes on the top are placed differently than on the original fender, try
but the forks actually have bolts in the correct place for the replacement fender as well, view so it should work out. The only problem is that I only have about an 8’x4’ space to work on it in the garage. The rest of the garage is filled with our moving stuff. I need to stop by Home Depot to buy some bags of dirt to make my homemade motorbike jack to lift the front of the bike up. Then I can change the front tire, adiposity
and replace the fender at the same time. Speaking of the fender, the color turns out to be a really nice dark greyish-blue. It is actually one of the colors I was thinking of painting the bike, so I guess it’s decided. I shouldn’t have any problem finding a matching color at the auto parts store. The photo above is what my bike will look like. I am even going to paint the side covers white to match the legshield. I just need to search for a luggage rack like the one in the photo, but it shouldn’t be too hard to find since they are still produced in Japan.

The other night I decided to take the C70 out for another spin. The cub turned over and started right up, but then it died after about half a minute. I couldn’t get it started again, so I wheeled it back towards the garage. Before I actually put it in, I decided to try one last time, and lo and behold, it started up. This time, the bike’s weight and/or metal mass was enough to trip the entrance gate, so I was cruising around the neighborhood in no time. It was about 85°F out, so the wind felt really good. It is so much fun to ride, even if it’s only at a rather tame 30mph. I think it could probably hit 40mph easy, but I will wait until I put on the new tires before I try. I also need to get a new chain, because the one that is on it now is stretched and rubbing against the chain guard. I also fixed the right rear signal: the bulb wasn’t contacting the wire properly. Anyways, the ride was tons of fun. I rode around the old neighborhood, since it is not busy at all and I can have the whole road to myself. I am getting used to riding it, and shifting is becoming second nature. My friend Chris told me a bit about the correct way to apply pressure to the brake on a motorcycle, so I kept that in mind when slowing down at the stop signs.

The list of things to do are:

Fix speedometer bulbs
Fix front brake lever switch
Replace chain
Adjust pistons
Replace tires
Replace fender
Replace petcock

I moved my bike from the balcony closet to the garage last night. I figured I would take a picture of it while it was in the livingroom. Before I took it to the garage, capsule
I went for a little spin around the neighborhood. I learned a couple things… first, anesthetist
the bike is not big enough to trip the parking gates. I had to wait for a car to come along and open them. Second, remedy
the light for the speedometer is out. It probably just needs a bulb.

When I came back to the parking lot, I met a fellow tenant who was getting off of his Yamaha YZF-R6. We chatted a bit about our bikes and he took a photo of my C70 with his camera phone. It turns out that he had never ridden a motorcycle before he bought his, just a few months ago. He said his friend had one, so he got one too. He didn’t take the MSF class, and failed his written test, so he has to go back tomorrow to retake it. Speaking of the MSF class, I am going to take it in a month or so. It should be really fun.

I found a blue fender for a C100 cub on Ebay today. It should fit my bike, view but may need some slight modifications, which might be as simple as drilling a couple holes in it. The C70 has I think five plastic body parts: the legshield, front fender, left side cover, right side cover, and lower handlebar cover. With the exception of the handlebar cover, all of those have some sort of damage to them on my bike. The side covers just have small hairline cracks, but I can live with those. The legshield is cracked in a few places, and I will eventually replace it, but am in no rush. The front fender had a crack in the very back, and it was ok, but then during the move, the fertilizer spreader in the garage fell back, and the handle whacked the fender right on top. It actually punched a hole through the top, and cracked it pretty good. I taped it up with packing tape, but it looks pretty bad. Hopefully the new fender will work out nicely.
I started it up today and ran it for about 20 minutes. In the storage closet off of the patio… I can’t wait to get out of our apartment and into our new house. I got new tires for the cub, sick
pilule but no tools or space to put them on. 🙁 Anyways, malady
I am keeping the cub’s battery charged, and it started up on the second try today. Lots of smoke came out of the exhaust at first. I hadn’t run it in over a month. It’s a great little bike with a super engine. I love it.
After waiting for three months, sovaldi the Michelin Gazelle tires I ordered for my C70 arrived at the shop. Apparently a big batch comes over from Asia to the distribution channels here in the states only a few times a year. But, illness
the bike is in storage while we wait for our new house to be built. I will have to put on the new tires later in the year. 🙁 Which reminds me, I gotta charge the battery…

I used to have this on my old website, unhealthy
and just recently found it again. It’s a quick Honda commercial featuring the Supercub. Speaking of the little Honda motorbike, case I was riding around the neighborhood at lunch, and it was totally fun. But the carb needs adjustment because the engine is not getting enough fuel at high rpm’s. I am waiting for a kit that will replace all the parts in the carb that I suspect are a little clogged. I also got a new battery and it is charged up. Next I will put in the headlight, since putting in a headlight without a charged battery will blow the bulb…

I went home at lunch to work a bit on my C70, bronchitis
and guess what? It finally started up! When it came to life, ed
my heart skipped a beat, it kind of scared me. Hehe. But it would only run for about 10 seconds or so before dieing. And there was a funny hissing sound coming from the exhaust, sort of like a pressure cooker. I suspected that the old muffler was clogged, so I straightened out a wire hanger and used it to clear the junk that was stuck in there. I think some wasps had made a nest in there… Anyways, after that, it started up so easily, and idled nicely. There’s a small screw on the side of the carb you use to adjust the idle, and I got it dialed in pretty good. Since I inflated the tires the day before, I decided to give it a go down the street. It shifted great into first and second, but I didn’t put it into third gear yet. I’ll wait until I get new tires and a helmet. But I am stoked that it’s running!!!!